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LG G Pad 8.3 video review: An 8in Android tablet for £199 is a steal


LG's latest stab at the tablet market is the G Pad 8.3 which you can buy for just £199.

At 8.3in, the G Pad is one of only a few tablets to buck the 10in and 7in trends. And the number not only signifies the screen size, but also how thin the tablet is. Visit Best Android tablets

LG's new slate doesn't feel like a sub-£200 tablet. Indeed, with that aluminium rear cover and nice build quality, it feels quite the opposite. It's just a shame that the device gets grubby with fingerprints all too easily.

It's easy to hold one handed in both portrait and landscape orientations and we like the inclusion of stereo speakers.

That 8.3 in screen has a Nexus 7 matching resolution and although the larger size means a lower pixel density it still looks great in its Full HD IPS splendour. It's a good screen size for a range of tasks.

Internal specifications are decent and performance is reliable most of the time. However, the homescreen occasionally take a second or two to load which is disappointing.

The G Pad 8.3 also doesn't have NFC but has an arguably handier feature in the form of an infrared transmitter. This means you can use it as a remote control for your TV and other devices around your home.

A 5Mp rear camera has no flash but takes surprisingly good photos, mainly thanks to its HDR mode and it can shoot up to Full HD video.

Running Android 4.2 Jelly Bean, things are a little out of date on the software front but LG makes up for this with plenty of added extras.

KnockON means you can switch the screen on and off with a double tap and feels like it should be on every touchscreen device.

Slide Aside is a handy although slightly unnecessary alternative to the built-in Android multi-tasking. And QSlide provides floating windows which can be made transparent.

The best feature by far is QPair which lets you pick up notifications and calls from your smartphone. You can reply to txts, have a phone call, transfer files and also use your phone's mobile data connection.

The tablet has a large battery and unless you set the screen brightness to maximum and play games constantly, it won't let you down – it holds its charge very well.

The G Pad 8.3 is undoubtedly LG's best tablet to date and at £199 it's a bit of a steal. A nice selection of hardware and software make this a great choice for a small tablet – earning it four stars and our recommended award.

Follow Chris Martin and @PCAdvisor on Twitter.

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