We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
iPad Apps Reviews
15,669 Reviews PC Advisor Recommended

Discworld: The Ankh-Morpork Map review

£9.99 including VAT

Manufacturer: Random House

Our Rating: We rate this 4.5 out of 5

Read our Discworld: The Ankh-Morpork Map review to find out if the first app to accompany Terry Pratchett's Discworld series of novels is worth its £10 price tag.

Disworld: The Ankh-Morpork Map for iPad

Discworld: The Ankh-Morpork Map is the first app to accompany Terry Pratchett's Discworld series of novels.

This iPad exclusive app has been based on The Compleat Ankh-Morpork book. At £10 it's at the expensive end of the app market and makes it one for Discworld fans only.

The Discworld app is made up of two maps: The first is top-down Google Maps style version with buildings and road names while the second is a 'living' interactive animated map. Both of these have been fantastically hand-drawn to a high level of detail which gives the app a really warm and charming essence.

See also: iPad app reviews.

The first and more basic map is a great accompaniment when you're reading one of Pratchett's Discworld books. Every time a road name, pub or other location is mentioned you'll feel the urge to go see it on the map as the characters you're reading about travel around the city.

Disworld: The Ankh-Morpork Map Street View

It is, however, not quite as exciting as the other map, which as you zoom in reveals more detail and comes to life with more than 1,500 residents of Ankh-Morpork meandering its streets and smoking chimneys. Our main gripe with the living map is that the ambient noise of the city, while fascinating as it changes depending on where you go, does get annoying after a while so we found ourselves muting the iPad.

The map is huge and you could find yourself spending hours exploring all the nooks and crannies as well as the well-known areas. There are more than 2,000 colour coded businesses, services and landmarks which you can click on. Each time you do you'll get a set of cards with a combination of information, quotes from Discworld books and gorgeous hand-drawn placards.

Disworld: The Ankh-Morpork Map achievment

Although it's not a game, Discworld connects to the Apple Game Center. This is because there are a set of achievements to be unlocked, the most fun of which is finding characters on the living map including Death, Commander Vimes and Rincewind. Other achievements include visiting places and delivering post for the Blind Letters Office. Each time you complete an achievement you're spurred on by cheers and applause.

While these are fun, they won't keep you entertained on a long-term basis. Using the map as a reference to the books is why you'll get your money's worth here.

Disworld: The Ankh-Morpork Map Walking Tours

Aside from freely exploring the city you can find specific things easily and quickly with the street index and city directory. With these you can search for and browse through all the guilds, pubs, temples and landmarks in Ankh-Morpork.

Furthermore, and a stand out feature of the Discworld app, is the ability to take three different walking tours around the city – 'Towers, Temples and Theatrical Treats', 'Guilds Governance and a Grand Vista', and finally 'Remedies, Rat Markets and a River View'. Hortensia d'Antiqua from the Guild of Historians, wonderfully voiced by Blackadder’s Helen Atkinson Wood, guides you round the streets highlighting landmarks and giving you interesting facts.

Follow Chris Martin and @PCAdvisor on Twitter.

Discworld: The Anhk-Morpork Map Expert Verdict »


There are currently no technical specifications recorded for this product.

  • Overall: We give this item 9 of 10 overall

Although it's quite expensive, Discworld: The Ankh-Morpork Map is both fun and informative making it a must have for Terry Pratchett fans. It's one of the best looking apps we've seen, has an incredibly high level of detail and more features than you'd expect for what is essentially a map.

  • Google Maps mapping and directions website

    Google Maps mapping and directions website

    Google Maps is a winner in many respects, but we don't like its cluttered interface.

  • Ask City mapping website

    Ask City mapping website

    There are enough drawing tools on Ask City to keep you busy for hours gussying up your maps. You can add text notes or draw segmented lines, squares, circles, and polygons, in any of 10 colours.

  • The TomTom Go 50 review: a good satnav with free map updates and real-time traffic information

    The TomTom Go 50: a good satnav with free map updates and real-time traffic information

    The TomTom Go 50 is a 5in satnav that's preloaded with maps for the whole of Europe, and has TomTom's latest interface for even faster navigation. With free map updates and live traffic via your smartphone, it has all the features. Here's our TomTom Go 50 review.

  • Navigon 4350max review

    Navigon 4350max

    The Navigon 4350max is a GPS satnav device that learns from driving habits to plan a route, thanks to MyRoutes technology. The Navigon 4350max also boasts Bluetooth hands-free capabilities, Lane Assistant Pro and 3D landmark views - a premium features list that represents good value.

  • Garmin nüvi 2599 LMT-D review: a great satnav with a capacitive screen and free map updates

    Garmin nüvi 2599 LMT-D: a great satnav with a capacitive screen and free map updates

    This mid-range satnav has lifetime free map updates and some extra features compared to entry-level models. Find out if it's the right satnav for you in our Garmin nüvi 2599 LMT-D review.


IDG UK Sites

Best Christmas 2014 UK tech deals, Boxing Day 2014 UK tech deals & January sales 2015 UK tech...

IDG UK Sites

LED vs Halogen: Why now could be the right time to invest in LED bulbs

IDG UK Sites

Christmas' best ads: See great festive spots studios have created to promote themselves and clients

IDG UK Sites

Why Apple shouldn't be blamed for exploitation in China and Indonesia