We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
Reviews
15,491 Reviews

Adobe Dreamweaver CS5.5 review

£428 inc VAT; £113 upgrade from CS5

Manufacturer: Adobe

Our Rating: We rate this 4 out of 5

If you’re serious about dynamic site and application development from scratch, Dreamweaver’s the closest thing to a universal tool – it does it all.

Dreamweaver, the flagship web authoring tool that Adobe acquired from Macromedia in the same buyout that netted it Flash, is a mature application. In Adobe Dreamweaver CS5.5 there is welcome enhanced support for the most current versions of HTML and CSS. The adoption of HTML5 elements in current browsers is accelerating, bringing rich media capability to the web without plug-ins.

CSS 3 is important, with drawing and animation features missing from previous versions. CS5.5 offers HTML5 support and live previews using the latest version of Webkit - the rendering engine that drives both Google Chrome and Safari.

Talking about HTML5, this version of Dreamweaver makes Adobe's most serious attempt to cater to multiplatform, with the Multiscreen authoring view, offering enhanced support for multiple content. Entering Multiscreen gives you design views for phone, desktop and tablet, live. It enables you to target and customise CSS for each form factor, with Dreamweaver writing the detection and selection code for you.

Despite Adobe's recent spat with Apple over Flash, the iPhone and iPad are directly catered for in this mobile-aware incarnation of Dreamweaver. Using the third-party PhoneGap framework, you're able to build and package apps using familiar web authoring languages. That's not the only partnership to enhance Dreamweaver CS5.5's production power. Support for the JQuery JavaScript framework brings complex and powerful interface and interaction capabilities to your pages, apps and sites.

Adobe software reviews

The new features in Dreamweaver are timely and valuable, but they are added to a package that's already stuffed with functionality. Dreamweaver's now an application builder, an IDE for mobile platforms, a theme builder for content management systems, and more. If we have a complaint, it's that Dreamweaver lacks focus and is in real danger of succumbing to bloat.

Adobe Dreamweaver CS5.5 Expert Verdict »

There are currently no technical specifications recorded for this product.

  • Overall: We give this item 8 of 10 overall

If you’re serious about dynamic site and application development from scratch, Dreamweaver’s the closest thing to a universal tool – it does it all.

There are currently no price comparisons for this product.
  • Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 review

    Adobe Creative Suite 5.5

    The primary focus of Creative Suite 5.5 is support for technological developments in the wider world - such as tablet-based digital magazines, HTML 5 on the web and stereoscopic video production.

  • Adobe Dreamweaver CS6 review

    Adobe Dreamweaver CS6

    Adobe Dreamweaver CS6 can help you design responsive sites that work across desktop, tablet and mobile.

  • Adobe Dreamweaver CS4 beta review

    Adobe Dreamweaver CS4 beta

    The public beta of Dreamweaver CS4 released by Adobe this week delivers significant changes to the 10-year old web-design and -development tool.

  • Adobe Dreamweaver CS4 review

    Adobe Dreamweaver CS4

    Dreamweaver CS4 finally feels like part of the Creative Suite. The revamped interface now shares the look and feel of Photoshop, Flash, and Illustrator.

  • Adobe Fireworks review

    Adobe Fireworks

    New features in Adobe Fireworks CS4 provide designers with advanced tools to create websites, applications, and interactive designs.


IDG UK Sites

Nokia Lumia 930 review: The flagship Windows Phone 8.1 smartphone

IDG UK Sites

Live Blog: Apple financial results, record June quarter, 35.2m iPhones sold, $37.4b revenue

IDG UK Sites

Welcome to the upgrade cycle - you'll never leave

IDG UK Sites

Why smartphone screens are getting bigger