We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
Office software Reviews
15,645 Reviews

Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010 review

TBC: New SCE 2010 pricing and licensing details will be made available at product General Availability of 1 June 2010

Manufacturer: Microsoft

Our Rating: We rate this 3.5 out of 5

Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010 is a systems management suite for midsize businesses that comprises part of Micosoft System Center 2010.

Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010 is a systems management suite for midsize businesses that comprises part of Microsoft System Center 2010.

Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010

System Center Essentials 2010 is the latest revision to the integrated systems management suite designed for midsize businesses. Microsoft already offers the full System Center suite for enterprises but has recently focused on filling the gap that often exists between product offerings for tiny shops with fewer than 25 people and global corporations with 5,000-plus users.

Microsoft has a pretty wide definition of what a midsize business looks like: It suspects such a business has between 25 and 400 PCs and five to 50 servers, doesn't already have systems management software, has fewer than five IT generalists in its internal support operation and predominantly uses Microsoft software. (Clearly that's a model picture in Microsoft's view.) Obviously, this vision is a bit more likely in the smaller end of that space, with more heterogeneity probable in the upper end of the midsize market.

In any event, Essentials 2010 is designed to help make an environment not managed by specialists every bit as efficient and healthy as one that is. Essentials 2010 attempts to achieve three key goals:

  • Monitor the total environment of a network and proactively alert administrators to, and sometimes automatically fix, problems that crop up - anywhere from a client PC to a server to a piece of software.
  • Deploy software and patches in an efficient, streamlined way, rather than sneakernetting CDs and DVDs around the office.
  • Integrate virtualisation strategies and techniques into a market that traditionally hasn't been ready for that complexity.

Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010: The interface

Essentials 2010's interface will be comfortable for Outlook users; the team redesigned the interface to be more fluid and expose more functionality with fewer clicks. The administrative console is easy to navigate. Thanks to the comprehensive task list that appears in the pane on the right, we didn't spend a lot of time looking for features.

Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010: Updates and software deployment

Essentials 2010 integrates Windows Server Update Services more fully with Essentials' administrative console, monitoring capabilities and deployment features.

At its core, WSUS attempts to automate the patching process as much as possible. Between Essentials and WSUS, the tools can discover which updates are required in your environment and set auto-approval deadlines for update deployment; these are the dates at which a particular update will automatically be deployed, even without an administrator's explicit approval.

Another feature is the ability to perform those update installations according to the class of machine - workstation or server. Since patching is likely a manual process in these environments, Essentials tries to take the menial work out of the task and improve system health. In the end, it works pretty well.

Essentials also attempts to make the process of deploying software much more streamlined than running software discs around an office. It puts an attractive, easy-to-use interface around Group Policy-based software deployment and also adds some intelligence found in the suite's big brother, System Center Configuration Manager, so that pushing out Office to 150 clients, for example, doesn't take weeks.

We found the deployment wizards much simpler to understand than the native Windows Server/Active Directory tools. The additional capabilities for non-Microsoft Installer-based software packages not found natively in Windows are also welcome.

Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010: Supporting virtualisation in the midmarket

The virtualization phenomenon is in full swing, and one could reasonably wonder why Essentials 2010 took as long as it did to integrate virtual machine technology into its core. Quibbling aside, in Essentials 2010 Microsoft has added virtualization hand-holding for the IT generalist: there are wizards to perform many common VM-related tasks, including building new virtual machines from scratch and importing existing VMs into the Essentials management console, with support for both Microsoft's VHD format and VMware's folders. Templates can be used when creating VMs to achieve consistent performance and "spec'ing" of your VM farms, and a tool that intelligently decides the best host for a particular VM is included as well.

Converting existing physical machines to VMs, a process known as P2V, can be handled from within the Essentials 2010 console. And once the VMs are created and placed, and the Essentials agent installed on them, they can of course be managed and monitored like any computer on the network. You can also live-migrate VMs as well (that is, move a virtual machine from one host to another without any downtime).

 NEXT: our expert verdict >>

Computerworld.com

Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010 Expert Verdict »
Dual core server with 2.8GHz or faster processors
4GB RAM or more
20GB of available hard disk space (1GB on the system drive)
150GB of available hard disk space if planning virtualisation management
CD and DVD Drive
DVD-compatible drive
1024x768 or higher-resolution monitor
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard or Enterprise Edition, X64
or Windows Server 2008 Standard or Enterprise Edition, x86 or x64
or Windows Server 2003 Standard or Enterprise Edition, x86 or x64, with Service Pack 2 (SP2) or later
or Windows Small Business Server 2008, x64 only
or Windows Essentials Business Server 2008, x64 only
Microsoft .NET Framework, version 3.5 with SP1 or later
Active Directory must be deployed in the environment
Internet access
Actual requirements will vary based on your system configuration and the management packs and number of features you choose to install
  • Overall: We give this item 7 of 10 overall

Micosoft System Center Essentials 2010 serves a purpose in this market segment. It adds some welcome touches to update deployment and removes a lot of the mystique around how to deploy virtualisation technology in the middle market. It can also save staffers a lot of time through better monitoring and better software installation methods. The redesigned interface is simple and comfortable, and the product's limitations are few - and all in all, it's appropriate for a product that's lighter than the full System Center suite. On the other hand, it's not right for your business if you're already in the upper bounds of the projected user range (more than 400 PCs), if you run a very heterogeneous environment either on the client or on the server, or if virtualisation isn't at the top of your company's to-do list.

There are currently no price comparisons for this product.
  • Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Beta 1 review

    Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Beta 1

    Although not without problems, Microsoft Visual Studio is the premier IDE for developing applications with the Microsoft .Net Framework and at least a contender for the best Windows-hosted C/C++ IDE.

  • Parallels Desktop 6 for Mac review

    Parallels Desktop 6 for Mac

    The latest Parallels Desktop 6 for Mac adds new features and performance to this versatile package for running Windows and Linux on a Mac, without rebooting

  • Microsoft Exchange 2010 beta review

    Microsoft Exchange 2010 beta

    Microsoft Exchange 2010 is light on wholesale changes and heavy on refinements.

  • Webroot Internet Security Essentials 2010 review

    Webroot Internet Security Essentials 2010

    Webroot Internet Security Essentials 2010 is in essence Webroot's SpySweeper antivirus/antispyware application packaged with a firewall, an antispam utility, backup software, and internet browsing protection thrown in.

  • VMware Fusion 2.0 Beta 2 review

    VMware Fusion 2.0 Beta 2

    VMware has opened the doors to the second beta release of VMware Fusion 2.0, VMware's Mac desktop virtualisation package.


IDG UK Sites

Swatch to release its own line of smartwatches to rival iWatch

IDG UK Sites

From the iPhone 6 to the iWatch and a new Apple TV we look at the products Apple is set to launch...

IDG UK Sites

Miranda July's Somebody app offers a very unusual take on messaging

IDG UK Sites

The 7 most ridiculous iPhone 6 rumours: what Apple WON'T reveal on 9 September