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Programming software Reviews
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JavaRebel review

$149 (about £102) per single user licence

Manufacturer: ZeroTurnaround

Our Rating: We rate this 3.5 out of 5

Edit-compile-test-edit-compile-test. This is the "software development cycle" all programmers know well, from "Hello World" onwards. JavaRebel is a JAR file which will allow you to skip directly from "edit" to "test" while eliminating "compile" (most of the time).

Edit-compile-test-edit-compile-test. This is the "software development cycle" all programmers know well, from "Hello World" onwards. JavaRebel is a JAR file which will allow you to skip directly from "edit" to "test" while eliminating "compile" (most of the time).

Using JavaRebel is extremely simple: just pass an appropriate command when you invoke your Java Virtual Machine. It took us about 30 seconds to get it working in Eclipse. Once it's there, it's transparent - and useful.

To test JavaRebel, we launched an application, then, while the application was running, added in some additional output code to the event handler for a button.

After a second or two, we received a notice in our console window that the relevant classes had been reloaded, and the button now executed its modified behaviour.

We can foresee this saving a tremendous amount of debugging time. Even a few minutes a day saved re-launching apps adds up, over a year, to hours or even days of productivity, depending on re-deployment time after minor edits.

There are a few changes it can't handle - you can't change class hierarchy or implement new interfaces, for example, but it's unlikely you'd be making changes like that during a standard edit-compile-test cycle.

There is also a risk factor; if the app you're working on is "live" and you are careless with your configuration, you could introduce new bugs into running code. However, that's a user error and hardly the fault of the program.

The trial version of JavaRebel lasts for 30 days and prints a message in the console window when run. This should be long enough to determine if the utility provided is worth it.

JavaRebel Expert Verdict »

Java 4 or better
Windows XP/Vista
  • Overall: We give this item 7 of 10 overall

A potentially useful and cost-saving tool, if you're a programmer it's worth grabbing the 30-day trial of JavaRebel.

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