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Compact cameras Reviews
15,104 Reviews

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 review

£311.68 inc VAT

Manufacturer: Sony

Our Rating: We rate this 3 out of 5

Are you looking for a stylish camera or a rugged camera? Usually you have to pick one trait or the other, but the 10-megapixel Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 offers both.

Are you looking for a stylish camera or a rugged camera? Usually you have to pick one trait or the other, but the 10-megapixel Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 offers both.

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 looks just like many of the other slim, fashionable models in the Cyber-shot TX series, but this camera is built to withstand shocks, water, freezing, heat, and dust. In fact, we had to look twice to make sure we were holding the right camera before we dunked it into the pool. The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 comes in green, pink, red, black, and silver, and is priced at £329.

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 camera is waterproof down to 10 feet below the surface, shockproof to falls of as much as 5 feet, and dustproof; it can withstand temperatures from 14 degrees to 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Beyond its stylish exterior, it also has features that make it a good choice for day-to-day use, including anti-motion-blur mode, Sony's revamped Intelligent Sweep Panorama mode, and a high-definition movie mode that records 720p MPEG-4 video at 30 frames per second.

The DSC-TX5 feels pretty sturdy - as a rugged camera should - and it has a shiny sliding cover to protect its 4X-optical-zoom Carl Zeiss lens (25mm wide-angle to 100mm telephoto). We found the lens cover a little hard to slide, especially in the water. You get a choice of storage formats: the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 camera takes SD/SDHC cards in addition to Sony's proprietary Memory Stick Pro Duo format, and it also provides 45MB of internal memory.

Aside from the slippery lens cover, the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 is fairly easy to use. The camera features a 3-inch touchscreen for controlling most of its functions, which seems like an odd choice for a camera partially designed to be used underwater, but surprisingly the DSC-TX5 seemed more responsive underwater than on dry land. On terra firma, we had to press on-screen icons several times before the screen would register my touch, but the screen reacted quickly when we used it underwater.

Though the controls are mostly on the touchscreen, the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 has a few hardware buttons - the power and shutter buttons, obviously, but also a zoom toggle and a play button. Loaded with its battery and a Memory Stick, the 10.2-megapixel DSC-TX5 weighs 128g; its slim frame measures just 94x56.9x17.7mm.

Testing the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5

The DSC-TX5 takes decent photos, but its overall image quality isn't outstanding. In the PCWorld.com Labs' subjective imaging tests, our jury gave the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 high marks for exposure quality, but below-average scores for colour accuracy, sharpness, and lack of distortion. As for video, the DSC-TX5 shot good-looking footage, but the on-board microphone was pretty weak. The DSC-TX5 received an overall imaging score of Fair.

In dark conditions, however, the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 camera performed well in hands-on tests. The DSC-TX5 boasts an Exmor R CMOS sensor, which Sony says is optimised for low-light shooting. The camera certainly did an impressive job of taking photos in low-light situations.

The camera has very little shutter lag and lag time in general, but the touchscreen's frequent lack of responsiveness cancels out the quick shutter on occasion. ISO control ranges from 125 to 3200, and images have surprisingly little noise unless you boost the ISO beyond 800. In Program Auto mode, you can also control the white balance, flash, EV, burst mode, self-timer, focus, metering mode, and face detection, as well as the smile-triggered shutter mode.

The menus on the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 are a bit confusing and unnecessarily bloated, as though Sony just went crazy with the possibilities that a touchscreen affords. Portions of the design are useful; for example, users can customise which four icons (white balance, flash, or the like) show on the side menu. Meanwhile, the rest of the menu options reside in a full-screen menu that you drag open from the left side of the display.

We would have preferred an option in which all of the icons are visible in the left menu with a simple scroll, as the slide-open menu can get annoying quickly. The menus also have a lot of icons that you can drag around and reorder - pretty unnecessary, if you ask us

Deleting images is tricky with the touchscreen, too. In the camera's "delete multiple images" option, it's too easy to accidentally select images you don't want to delete; each time you tap the screen to scroll through images, you frequently end up selecting one for deletion. To avoid that problem, you can instead use on-screen arrows to scroll through the pictures, but the arrows don't register well (lots of frustrating tapping ensues).

NEXT: our expert verdict >>

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 Expert Verdict »
Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-TX5 Scores 8.8 out of 10 based on 149 reviews
CCD Size: 1/2.4 inch
Focal Length (35mm equiv) for Digital Compact Cameras/Lenses25-100mm
Optical Zoom Banding: 4-4.9x
Megapixel Banding: 10 to 10.9 Megapixels
Maximum Image Resolution: 3648x2736 pixels
Optical Zoom: 4x
Digital Zoom: 2x
Macro: 1cm
Memory Stick Pro Duo High Speed, Memory Stick PRO-HG Duo , On board, SD Card, SDHC, Memory Stick Duo, Memory Stick Pro Duo
Internal Memory: 45MB
HDMI, USB 2.0
3in LCD monitor
Built-in Flash
Audio Recording
Burst Mode
Exposure Compensation
Movie Mode: Component, PAL, NTSC
94x56.9x17.7mm
128g
  • Overall: We give this item 6 of 10 overall

Although the touchscreen is sometimes frustrating, the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX5 is a decent entry into the rugged-camera market that looks stylish enough for everyday use. We would have appreciated at least one more hardware button for quickly cycling through shooting styles, because the last thing we want to do when we're scuba diving is to fool with confusing touchscreen menus. That said, it's certainly the most day-to-day-friendly rugged camera we've seen, and its features and its low-light shots are impressive.

There are currently no price comparisons for this product.
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