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NAS (network storage) Reviews
15,523 Reviews

QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo review

£894 inc VAT

Manufacturer: QNAP

Our Rating: We rate this 3.5 out of 5

The QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo device is built for those who need 12TB of storage capacity but aren't fussed too much about speed. There are much faster - and cheaper - alternatives. However, the TS-659 Pro Turbo has plenty of server features to suit both the home and small offices.

The QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo device is built for those who need 12TB of storage capacity but aren't fussed too much about speed. There are much faster - and cheaper - alternatives. However, the TS-659 Pro Turbo has plenty of server features to suit both the home and small offices.

The QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo NAS packs six drive bays and up to 12 terabytes of storage into a compact, energy-efficient box. Armed with Intel's Atom D510 processor and QNAP's latest firmware, this network-attached storage (NAS) device is a competent server, though its speed is disappointing.

QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo: Enclosure

There are very few aesthetic differences between the QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo and TS-639 Pro Turbo we reviewed last year. The QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo NAS looks like an elongated TS-459 Pro Turbo NAS, but two fans on the back of the chassis should help keep the hard drives extra cool. The brushed metal enclosure makes the TS-659 Pro Turbo NAS more attractive than the vast majority of plastic NAS devices. The NAS device's drive bays are individually lockable but they aren't tool-less (you'll need to screw the drives in prior to inserting the trays).

The QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo NAS has four USB ports on the back panel, and a fifth at the front. A one-touch copy button can be configured to back up to or from external hard drives. Two eSATA ports allow for fast transfers from external storage, though the NAS device only supports ext3, ext4, NTFS and FAT32 file systems; hard drives with the HFS+ file system (used by Mac OS X) are not currently supported.

There are two Gigabit Ethernet ports on the back of the QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo NAS device which support failover and load balancing. This means that both ports can balance network traffic over a single IP address; if one port fails, the other will simply continue operating as normal.

Intel's newest dual core Atom CPU, the D510, and 1GB of memory power the QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo. Clocked at 1.66GHz, the processor is built for low-power desktops rather than netbooks, so it will provide better performance than older Atom processors while retaining relatively low power consumption.

Considering the QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo runs the same basic hardware as the TS-459 Pro Turbo, it is no surprise that power consumption is about the same. With two Barracuda 7200.11 1.5TB hard drives running in a RAID 0 array, we found the NAS device consumed between 23.9 Watts and 42.8W.

QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo: Performance

We test all NAS devices by connecting them through a Gigabit Ethernet network to a testbed PC with a 300GB Western Digital Velociraptor hard drive. We run Intel's NAS Performance Toolkit, which determines how the QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo NAS device performs when streaming 720p high-definition media from the device as well as the ability to record the same video while performing backup operations.

We also run two file transfer tests to see how the NAS device performs in the real word. One file transfer test uses 3000 1MB files; this is intensive for both the hard drives and the embedded processor, and a good indication of how it will perform when backing up your computer. In addition, we transfer 20GB worth of 3-4GB files, a faster test that is similar to dealing with large videos, disk images or database files.

The QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo NAS device's performance was in some instances half that of the cheaper, four-bay TS-459 Pro Turbo. Our benchmarks show that the NAS device falls behind similarly capable alternatives in Intel's NAS Performance Toolkit, while, surprisingly, reading data is slower than writing it. This is likely due to the SATA controller, which has to handle six drives simultaneously rather than four. Though the TS-659 Pro Turbo remains a reasonable performer, we would stick with the cheaper model for performance-intensive tasks.

NEXT: user interface >>

Related articles:

QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo Expert Verdict »
12TB network-attached storage (NAS) device
Black
235x257x175mm
6.5kg
1GB DDR2 RAM
1.66GHz D510 Intel Atom processor
eSATA
  • Overall: We give this item 7 of 10 overall

The QNAP TS-659 Pro Turbo NAS device doesn't lack server features, but the data transfer and streaming performance is disappointing when compared to cheaper alternatives. If storage capacity takes precedence over speed, it is certainly worth a look.

There are currently no price comparisons for this product.
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