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Storage Devices Reviews
15,670 Reviews PC Advisor Recommended

Kingston DataTraveler Vault Privacy review

£25.9 inc VAT

Manufacturer: Kingston

Our Rating: We rate this 4.5 out of 5

The Kingston DataTraveler Vault Privacy is another USB drive not strictly aimed at consumers. But if it's good enough for the government, it can probably handle a few of our secure files.

The Kingston DataTraveler Vault Privacy is another USB drive not strictly aimed at consumers. But if it's good enough for the government, it can probably handle a few of our secure files.

The Kingston DataTraveler Vault Privacy has the same look and feel as the BlackBox but is considerably lighter. Security features are also identical, except this far-cheaper drive hasn't been FIPS-certified.

As with the BlackBox, then, the Kingston DataTraveler Vault Privacy features 256bit AES encryption and strong password-protection and will automatically reformat itself after 10 failed access attempts.

Despite Kingston claiming the same 24 megabits per second (Mbps) read speeds for the DataTraveler Vault Privacy as with the BlackBox, this drive's has far slower write speeds at just 10Mbps.

Also see:


Transcend JetFlash 220

Kingston DataTraveler BlackBox

Sandisk Extreme Cruzer Contour

Kingston DataTraveler Vault Privacy Expert Verdict »

Available in 1GB/2GB/4GB/8GB/16GB/32GB capacities
256bit AES encryption
strong password-protection
automatically reformats itself after 10 failed access attempts
USB 2.0
24Mbps read speeds
10Mbps write speeds
78x22x12mm
five-year warranty
  • Build Quality: We give this item 9 of 10 for build quality
  • Features: We give this item 9 of 10 for features
  • Value for Money: We give this item 8 of 10 for value for money
  • Overall: We give this item 9 of 10 overall

The Kingston DataTraveler Vault Privacy is secure enough to protect government data, so it's good enough for us. It's read and write speeds aren't amazing, but the price tag is tempting for the privacy it affords.

  • Kingston DataTraveler BlackBox review

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  • Kingston DataTraveler Vault Privacy Edition review

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    Very few USB keys come with encryption, yet they are one of the easiest ways to copy and to carry files - for both the legitimate user and anyone who feels like siphoning them off on the sly. Here then, is the Kingston DataTraveler Vault Privacy Edition.

  • Kingston DataTraveler Vault – Privacy Edition 16GB review

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    Security and high capacity come together in one stick with the Kingston DataTraveler Vault – Privacy Edition 16GB... at a price

  • Sandisk Extreme Cruzer Contour review

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    The Sandisk Extreme Cruzer Contour is the only drive in our group test to lack dedicated security. It does, however, feature U3 software that allows you to carry your applications around with you and launch them on any PC.

  • Kingston DataTraveler Locker+ 16GB review

    Kingston DataTraveler Locker+ 16GB

    The Kingston DataTraveler Locker+ 16GB is a secure USB flash drive that offers public and encrypted partitions.


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