We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
PC games software Reviews
15,497 Reviews

Battlefield 3 review

£25 (PC), £35 (360/PS3)

Manufacturer: EA

Our Rating: We rate this 3.5 out of 5

A sloppy single-player campaign met with matchless multiplayer makes for an unbalanced first-person shooter experience.

My evidence is purely anecdotal, but going by what readers and gamer friends (who work outside the industry) tell me, almost no one plays the single-player campaigns of shooters like Battlefield or Call of Duty. Honestly, I couldn't find anyone outside of the people I know who review games for a living who actually bothers with the single-player campaigns. I know that, after playing through Battlefield 3's single-player campaign, I may never want to again either.

Generally, I like single-player campaigns in big military shooters. A little story makes the murder of hundreds of faceless henchmen go down a little easier. And their scripted nature gives the game makers a chance to create big dramatic set-pieces that show off their awesome graphics or sound or both at the same time with heart-racing battle sequences that make for such compelling television commercials. Oh hey, maybe that's why they bother making them!

But sometimes developers can get a bit carried away. Admittedly, the graphics in Battlefield 3 set a new standard, even on consoles. The lighting is amazing, and the level of details and textures you see on characters is very impressive. But I didn't really need the constant water spots that were supposed to be on my goggles (I guess, I'm pretty sure I wasn't always wearing them) -- they actually block a lot of the action. The same goes for the kind of over-scripting of some sequences, complemented with some dreadful quick-time button press mini-games. How many times do we have to tell developers to stop it with those?

I used to really like the Battlefield: Bad Company single-player campaigns because they were charming and featured characters I got invested in thanks to some snappy writing. Oh, and the action was still pretty awesome, even if it remained centred around one well-travelled little squad. Battlefield 3 has got its serious face on though, and is making a really strong attempt to be a Modern Warfare game. Notice I didn't say "like" a Modern Warfare game.

But DICE seems like they weren't really up to the task. The plot has all the requisite stolen nukes, shifty Russians and dusty Middle Eastern alleyways you could ask for. But the script is unbelievably tone deaf when it comes to portrayals of members of the U.S. armed forces. I don't know how they do it in Sweden, but no way is a Marine, on active duty, going to get questioned by two civilians (I don't care if they're supposed to be Homeland Security or what) about sensitive, probably classified field operations without a senior officer or Judge Advocate General there. I know that American media permeates foreign television, but you guys mixed up your cop drama with your military procedurals.

Battlefield 3

There's another plot point later that's even more egregious in its unbelievably, which is truly the sign of writers who really don't know how to construct plot devices for a thriller. But I think I'm digressing from what most of you really care about. I guess if gamers don't care about plot and story, then neither should the people making the games. Ultimately, Battlefield 3's single-player campaign is simply dull, with a handful of potentially thrilling set pieces (I'll just say "Russian paratroopers" and leave it at that) tied together by boring-as-hell corridor runs. The single-player campaign feels rushed, and tacked on, and it's a drag on the rest of the experience. I guess next time I should do what everyone else does and ignore it?

Next page: Multiplayer

Battlefield 3 Expert Verdict »
Available on Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 and PC. PC system requirements: OS: Windows Vista or Windows 7 Processor: Core 2 Duo 2.4 GHz or Althon X2 2.7 GHz RAM: 2GB Graphic card: DirectX 10 or 11 compatible Nvidia or AMD ATI card, ATI Radeon 3870 or higher, Nvidia GeForce 8800 GT or higher. Graphics card memory: 512 MB Sound card: DirectX compatibl sound card Hard drive: 15 GB for disc version or 10 GB for digital version
  • Overall: We give this item 7 of 10 overall

Fantastic multiplayer we will be playing for months and probably years to come, while the mindblowing PC graphics have been scaled extremely well to the consoles -- the game almost always looks great; some fairly sweet set-pieces that incorporate vehicles and large-scale areas in a satisfying way. Unfortunately, singleplayer is a mess of mundane set-pieces, and corridor shooting sections that feel very outdated, together with a plot full of ridiculous and unlikely scenarios that never does anything to earn our suspension of disbelief, and the whole thing suffers glitches galore.

There are currently no price comparisons for this product.
  • Command & Conquer 4: Tiberian Twilight review

    Command & Conquer 4: Tiberian Twilight

    Command & Conquer 4: Tiberian Twilight is the latest installment in EA's long-running RTS franchise.

  • Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 review

    Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3

    Activision manages the tricky feat of offering more of the same for the fans and some shiny new features for the non-fans.

  • Crysis 2 review

    Crysis 2

    This Nanosuited sequel to the classic Crysis is a stellar sci-fi shooting game, featuring a gripping single-player campaign, action-packed multiplayer, and some jaw-dropping visuals.

  • Trenched

    Like Double Fine's other recent downloadable games, this mech-based tower defence title is completely enjoyable throughout.

  • Command & Conquer 3: Tiberium Wars

    Command & Conquer 3: Tiberium Wars

    We've been waiting a while to review Command & Conquer 3: Tiberium Wars, the final installment in the Tiberium trilogy, but it's been worth it.


IDG UK Sites

Nokia replaces budget Lumia 520 with 530: Release date, price and specs

IDG UK Sites

Everything you need to know about Apple's iPhone Camera in iOS 8

IDG UK Sites

Why you shouldn't trust password managers

IDG UK Sites

How to make an 'Apple iWatch' using an iPod nano and a 3D printer