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X-Men Origins: Wolverine review

£39 inc VAT

Manufacturer: Activision

Our Rating: We rate this 3.5 out of 5

Everyone's favourite cigar-chomping, catch-phrase slinging, animalistic mutant makes his next-generation solo debut with the X-Men Origins: Wolverine game for consoles and PC - a simplistic hack-and-slash movie tie-in.

Everyone's favourite cigar-chomping, catch-phrase slinging, animalistic mutant makes his next-generation solo debut with the X-Men Origins: Wolverine game for consoles and PC - a simplistic hack-and-slash movie tie-in.

X-Men Origins: Wolverine - looks good?

Graphically, Origins is a mixed bag. The pre-rendered cut-scenes are simply astonishing, and Raven did a marvelous job with many of the main character models (Hugh Jackman's Wolverine is simply astonishing, right down to the stubble) but as the game progresses, it becomes increasingly obvious that the game's lustre wasn't distributed equally.

For each bump-mapped to perfection shot of Logan, you're going to face a blocky, lacklustre Mystique or Wraith. For each jaw-droppingly detailed shot of untamed Africa, you're going to be met with test tube after identical test tube in the Weapon X facilities. Incredible amounts of slowdown when too many enemies fill the screen, not to mention a terrible case of clipping and invisible walls, also ruins the flow of the fast-paced, breakneck gameplay.

X-Men Origins: Wolverine - redeeming qualities

Okay, I know I've been pretty rough on Origins so far, but the game definitely has its redeeming qualities. From the ability to customise Logan's strengths and Mutagens as you level up to the amount of material laid out for fans of both the comics and the X-Men films, there's definitely aspects that any geek will drool over.

For the most part, the game's animations flow fantastically and you can't help but feel like a badass when you unleash a Claw Drill on Gambit's smug Cajun ass. But the trade-off is always there: for every awesome moment like slashing your way through a room full of pissed off robots there is an equally tedious moment spent pushing boxes around and turning cranks.

The best at what he does?

NEXT PAGE: our expert verdict

X Men Origins Wolverine Expert Verdict »
Windows PC
Sony PlayStation 3, PlayStation 2
Microsoft Xbox 360
  • Overall: We give this item 7 of 10 overall

Its repetitive gameplay, mundane puzzle design and eye-twitching platforming segments really cuts into Origins' fun and yet, for fans of the franchise, it's a solid title that's worth playing through. It will even make the most jaded comic fan smirk every once in a while. However, if you're not a huge fan of Wolverine, I'd suggest you sink your claws into something else.

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