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Operating systems software Reviews
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Apple OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion review

£13.99 inc VAT

Manufacturer: Apple

Our Rating: We rate this 4.5 out of 5

Apple's Mountain Lion is the new OS X, version 10.8, and the eighth update in 11 years to the Mac operating system. We walk you through the new features to see if this Lion's reached his summit.

Apple updates its iOS mobile operating system once a year. But why should the iPhone and iPad have all the fun? On Thursday 16 February Apple announced that it will release a new version of OS X – Mountain Lion – this summer, just a year after the release of OS X Lion.

Like Lion, Mountain Lion offers numerous feature additions that will be familiar to iOS users. This OS X release continues Apple’s philosophy of bringing iOS features “back to the Mac”, and includes iMessage, Reminders, Notes, Notification Center, Twitter integration, Game Center, and AirPlay Mirroring. 

10.8 overview

Mountain Lion offers new features such as (left to right) Notes, Reminders, Messages, and Notification Center.

As the first OS X release post-iCloud, there’s also much more thorough integration with Apple’s data-syncing service. 

Mountain Lion brings options to limit which kinds of apps users can install. And although there are no actual mountain lions in China, OS X Mountain Lion does add a raft of features to speak to users in the country that’s Apple’s biggest growth opportunity.

Mountain Lion will be a paid upgrade to OS X; like Lion, it will be available only via a Mac App Store download. Apple hasn’t yet set a price or a release date more specific than “summer”. Mac developers will be able to download a developer release of Mountain Lion on Thursday, giving them several months to update their apps to take advantage of the new features in the release.

We’ve had a few days to use an early development version of Mountain Lion. Here’s a look at what’s new so far, keeping in mind that Apple may add and change features over the next few months as we get closer to the planned release.

iOS apps come to the Mac

Mountain Lion comes with several new apps that will seem quite familiar to iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch users. Reminders, Notes, and Game Center have all made the move to the Mac.

10.8 reminders

The new Notes app looks quite familiar.

Reminders and Notes look very much like they do on iOS. And thanks to iCloud syncing, they’ll display the same data that shows up on your mobile devices. These are still quite simple apps – the goal seems to have been to provide parity with their iOS analogues. The Notes app does support rich text, so you can choose different fonts, insert photos and attachments, create bulleted lists, and drag in URLs to create hyperlinks.

Game Center was introduced to users with iOS 4.1 in September 2010, and was then expanded in iOS 5. Now it comes to the Mac, letting Mac gamers find friends and compare their gaming prowess, as well as play against each other. 

Mac game developers get access to a centralized system for network play, opponent matching, in-game voice chat, and more. And yes, Game Center can work across platforms, so games that run on both Mac and iOS can interoperate.

iChat becomes Messages

There’s never been a version of iChat for iOS – instead, Apple handles text messages using the Messages app. That app started life as the Text app, which was used just for SMS messaging on the iPhone. When Apple introduced the new iMessage communication system, it renamed the app Messages.

10.8 crossdevice

With Mountain Lion, the same thing’s happening to Lion. All the features of iChat are still there, but the app’s been renamed Messages and it now supports iMessage (and is now integrated with FaceTime). You can use Messages to send text or images to anyone on a device capable of using iMessage – namely, devices running iOS 5, and Macs running Messages. Unlike SMS text messages, the iMessage system transfers data via the internet, so there are no text charges.

10.8 gadugadu

iMessage, meet the Mac

Like Messages on the iPhone, Messages for Mac lets you hold multi-person chats and can optionally let people know when you’ve received and read their messages and when you’re typing a reply. An integrated video-chat button allows you to kick off a video chat with capable devices, either over AIM (as iChat has always done) or by launching the FaceTime app.

For iOS 5 users who have been waiting for iChat to support iMessage, this is great news – but having to wait until Mountain Lion’s release this summer could be an exercise in frustration. There’s good news on that front: Apple says that Lion users will be able to download a beta version of Messages starting Thursday 16 February. The final version will be available in Mountain Lion.

Enter Notification Center

Sometimes one of your apps needs to get your attention. For years, many Mac app developers have built their own (think reminder pop-ups in iCal or Microsoft Office). The open-source project Growl has for years attempted to create a more general notification system supported by lots of apps.

With Mountain Lion, Mac OS X gains a system-level notification system accessible to every developer, with features much like those already found in iOS. 

Alerts appear in the top right corner of the screen in a small bubble. Notifications remain there for five seconds, and then slide off screen to the right. Alerts, on the other hand, remain on-screen until you click on the Show or Close (or in the case of some alerts, Snooze) buttons. 

10.8 snooze

In iOS 5, you see all your recent notifications by pulling down from the top of the screen to reveal Notification Center. In Mountain Lion, the Notification Center list is a narrow band that lives just to the right side of your screen. You can reveal it either by clicking on the new Notification Center icon at the far right of the menu bar, or by swiping with two fingers starting at the far right edge of the trackpad. Either way, your Mac’s entire screen will slide to the left, revealing a list of what’s been trying to get your attention recently.

There’s also a new Notifications pane in the System Preferences app, analogous to the Notifications submenu in iOS’s Settings app. From here you can choose which apps appear within Notification Center and how their alert bubbles behave.

NEXT PAGE >> Gatekeeper, AirPlay Sharing and more...

Apple OS X Mountain Lion Expert Verdict »

OS X Mountain Lion requires a Mac with a 64-bit kernel. Mountain Lion supports the following Mac models: iMac (mid 2007 or later), MacBook (13-inch Aluminum, 2008), (13-inch, Early 2009 or later), MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid-2009 or later), (15-inch, 2.4/2.2 GHz), (17-inch, Late 2007 or later), MacBook Air (Late 2008 or later), Mac Mini (Early 2009 or later), Mac Pro (Early 2008 or later), Xserve (Early 2009)
  • Ease of Use: We give this item 9 of 10 for ease of use
  • Features: We give this item 9 of 10 for features
  • Value for Money: We give this item 10 of 10 for value for money
  • Performance: We give this item 9 of 10 for performance
  • Overall: We give this item 9 of 10 overall

There are some great new minor features and tweaks to Mountain Lion that make it a worthy upgrade for Lion users. The new security features alone should reduce the main vector of infection remaining on what is already the safest mainstream PC operating system available. Snow Leopard hold outs can be more assured that some minor problems with the king of the beasts seem to have been resolved, giving what is so far the most stable initial release of an incremental OS X update yet.


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