Whatever your initial impressions of Assassin's Creed, the Director's Cut Edition is unlikely to change them, but we did find enough improvements to warrant a new purchase for PC exclusive gamers.

The Assassin's Creed: Director's Cut visuals alone are worth the price of admission, especially if you're looking to get more use out of that new 9800GT video card.

As we mentioned in our original review, there's no denying Assassin's Creed's ambition and breathtakingly authentic visuals. In that regard, Assassin's Creed Director's Cut Edition feels completely at home on the PC by offering even further enhanced visuals via higher resolutions and tighter framerates (provided you've got a monster gaming rig).

The trade off, however, is a clunky keyboard and mouse control scheme that painfully reminds us of the game's console roots.

Thankfully, Assassin's Creed comes pre-configured for Xbox 360 and most other gamepads.

To further sweeten the deal, Ubisoft made a few tweaks to enemy AI-simply blending after a kill won't fool the guards anymore-and navigation, by giving you the ability to bypass The Kingdom and jump to any city once you've visited all three.

The real meat of Assassin's Creed: Director's Cut, however, comes in the form of new content, although sadly, there are no new storylines or assassination targets.

NEXT PAGE: the new features > >

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Whatever your initial impressions of Assassin's Creed, the Director's Cut Edition is unlikely to change them, but we did find enough improvements to warrant a new purchase for PC exclusive gamers.

The new features

Ubisoft packed in four new investigation types for a total of nine that breaks up the sometimes repetitive gameplay on the road to eviscerating your victims: archer assassination, rooftop race challenge, merchant stand destruction challenge and escort challenge.

Archer assassination places a time limit on ganking a handful of roof patrols, admittedly something you would be doing anyway, though it's fun to see just how cold and efficient you can be. Roof top races also add a time limit to roof hopping from point A to B, which can come in handy when plotting escape routes for later on, but doesn't really satisfy that killer instinct.

We had high hopes for the escort challenges, since shadowing your ward from the rooftops and picking off other would-be assassins really could have embodied the spirit of AC. Unfortunately, missions too often degenerated into brawls where the NPC informant did nothing but casually stroll through the city, occasionally stopping at a waypoint, and just look around dumbly as a cadre of city guards bumrush you, Altair.

The merchant stand destruction missions work exceptionally well if a bit thuggish, as you utilise the grab technique to fling bystanders into dinky storefronts then flee from the guards once they've noticed all the commotion. Just be sure to remember your escape routes from the rooftop race challenges.

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Assassins Creed Directors Cut Edition: Specs

  • Windows XP / Vista with DirectX 10
  • 2.6GHz Intel Pentium D, AMD Athlon 64 X2 3800+ or equivalent dual core processor
  • 1GB RAM for XP, 2GB for Vista
  • 8GB HDD Space
  • 256MB Graphics Card
  • Sound Card
  • DVD-ROM Drive
  • keyboard, mouse, optional controller (Xbox 360 Controller for Windows recommended)
  • Windows XP / Vista with DirectX 10
  • 2.6GHz Intel Pentium D, AMD Athlon 64 X2 3800+ or equivalent dual core processor
  • 1GB RAM for XP, 2GB for Vista
  • 8GB HDD Space
  • 256MB Graphics Card
  • Sound Card
  • DVD-ROM Drive
  • keyboard, mouse, optional controller (Xbox 360 Controller for Windows recommended)

OUR VERDICT

Whatever your initial impressions of Assassin's Creed, the Director's Cut Edition is unlikely to change them, but we did find enough improvements to warrant a new purchase for PC exclusive gamers.

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