The 27in Samsung C27A750 is one of two models in Samsung’s new CA750 range – the other, the C23A750 comes with a smaller 23in screen.  In previous flat-panels, the 27in size would have been enough to garner interest. But in a model packed with fascinating departures and tantalizing hints of what could be to come – amongst them Ultra-Wide Band technology and USB 3.0 hubs - potential users are spoilt for choice.

The Samsung C27A750 attempts to be different right out of the box, and not just because of its stunningly slim frame and highly polished black veneer. The stand is an all-in-one design that unfolds from the back, and allows for a fair degree of tilt.

Indeed, you can carry on pushing the screen back until it’s all but horizontal. Such an extreme would clearly be of little use, but it’s nice that you can find exactly the right angle at which to have the panel. It’s not perhaps the most stable of screens, but we can’t help but admire the C27A750 visually. However, look more closely at the base, and you start to see further differences.

With its subtle glowing icons and touch-sensitive buttons – there are no controls on the frame of the screen itself – it’s the base that holds the real power. The range of connectors located here include a D-Sub VGA port and HDMI (but no DVI) and four USB ports.

Of the latter, two are USB 3.0, allowing you to plug in USB 3.0 as well as USB 2.0 peripherals. You will need to plug the screen into the USB 3.0 port on a PC in order to get full 3.0 speeds though. You can also use the 10/100 Ethernet port to connect to a network.

But the real gem in the Samsung’s crown is its embracing of Ultra-Wireless Band (UWB) technology. The screen comes with a wireless dongle. Plug this into a laptop and load up the (Windows-only) drivers, and the screen will connect to the laptop without the need for any video cables.

Samsung recommends that the Samsung C27A750 screen be no more than 75cm away, although we found it worked effectively even when 2-3m away from the host laptop. The technology isn’t perfect – the software takes a bit of installation, and we suspect future dongles will have the software onboard so as to avoid this tedious process.

Nonetheless, the ability to do away with video cables makes UWB a real asset, and we suspect it won’t be long before a variation on this technology is used to connect more flat-panels.

Given the array of features on offer, it was always going to be difficult for the Samsung’s actual image quality to keep up. The use of a TN panel doesn’t help, and the viewing angles are poor – this is something of a drawback in a screen that plays so much on its wireless connectivity.

The Samsung C27A750 is also limited to a 1920 x 1080 resolution, where some 27in screens such as the Hazro HZ27WA will offer 2560 x 1440.

The image quality is pretty strong though, with a vivid colour palette and a subtle attention to detail. The picture isn’t quite as focused overall as we’d like, but the Samsung handles fast motion well, and should also prove a good choice for watching video. 

Samsung C27A750: Specs

  • 27in LCD monitor
  • 1920 x 1080 native resolution
  • LED backlit
  • TN technology
  • 0.31mm pixel pitch
  • 2ms response time
  • 1000:1 contrast ratio
  • 300cd/m2 brightness
  • D-Sub VGA, HDMI connectors
  • 10/100Mb/s ethernet
  • 2 x USB 2.0, 2 x USB 3.0 (USB 3.0 speed realized only with connection to PC)
  • UWB Technology
  • 44W power consumption
  • 639 x 233 x 485mm
  • 5.2kg
  • 27in LCD monitor
  • 1920 x 1080 native resolution
  • LED backlit
  • TN technology
  • 0.31mm pixel pitch
  • 2ms response time
  • 1000:1 contrast ratio
  • 300cd/m2 brightness
  • D-Sub VGA, HDMI connectors
  • 10/100Mb/s ethernet
  • 2 x USB 2.0, 2 x USB 3.0 (USB 3.0 speed realized only with connection to PC)
  • UWB Technology
  • 44W power consumption
  • 639 x 233 x 485mm
  • 5.2kg

OUR VERDICT

The Samsung C27A750 is chock-full of new technology, with UWB wireless display connection being the real highlight. But none of it comes cheap, and there are slight limitations to many of the features that we hope will be ironed out in future screens. Given that it costs nearly £500 for a flat-panel that uses TN technology, it isn’t good value for money. However, this does show us the way things may go, and should the price fall a little, it may prove an enticing taste of the future.

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