At £195 the BenQ GW2750HM costs considerably less than what you would pay for most other displays of this size. See also: Group test: what's the best display?

The BenQ GW2750HM certainly isn't going to win any design awards but it does have a trio of video inputs comprising VGA, DVI-D and HDMI along with an analogue audio input and a headphone socket. Internal audio is provided through a pair of integrated 2W speakers.

The real value of the BenQ GW2750HM monitor lies in the Vertical Alighment (VA) display panel which greatly increases the quality compared with TN panels.

Viewing angles are increased considerably, although they aren't quite as wide as on some of the latest IPS panels. The BenQ GW2750HM is also capable of extremely good contrast ratios, a fact which is borne out by our lab tests below.

One feature we really didn't like was the on-screen menu. Many users many never need to delve into the settings, although many image-tweaking features are to be found there, including BenQ's Senseye3 image enhancement technology and AMA response-time booster.

We found that not only are the control buttons awkwardly set out but the menus themselves are painfully slow. We can think of no reason why in 2012, a monitor menu system should run slow enough to cause use frustration at having to wait for the menus to change.

BenQ GW2750HM: Performance results

The BenQ GW2750HM delivered some of the best contrast results we've measured. Our checkerboard contrast figures are typically much lower than the manufacturers' stated specs. A score of 1,530:1 is therefore very impressive. Deep blacks and powerful bright whites enabled by the 300cd/m2 maximum output of the display make for very dynamic results, especially evident when gaming or watching video in a well-lit room. There was also no visible backlight ‘bleed' when displaying a black screen.

Colour accuracy was a bit disappointing though. Although it performed well after calibration, measured colour deviations were measurably higher straight out of the box than on many other lower-cost premium displays we've tested. It's by no means terrible, but we were certainly hoping for better.

BenQ GW2750HM: Specs

  • VA 27in display
  • native resolution: 1920x1080
  • pixel pitch: 0.311mm pixel
  • response: 6ms
  • dynamic contrast ratio: 20,000,000:1
  • measured contrast ratio: 100:1
  • brightness: 313.1
  • measured black point: 3.08
  • NTSC gamut: 92%
  • sRGB gamut: 71%
  • viewing angles: 178/178
  • 2x 2W speakers
  • 38.9W/19.6W
  • 654x489x191mm
  • 5.6kg
  • VA 27in display
  • native resolution: 1920x1080
  • pixel pitch: 0.311mm pixel
  • response: 6ms
  • dynamic contrast ratio: 20,000,000:1
  • measured contrast ratio: 100:1
  • brightness: 313.1
  • measured black point: 3.08
  • NTSC gamut: 92%
  • sRGB gamut: 71%
  • viewing angles: 178/178
  • 2x 2W speakers
  • 38.9W/19.6W
  • 654x489x191mm
  • 5.6kg

OUR VERDICT

The BenQ GW2750HM isn't perfect: Build quality is average and the styling is unremarkable, it also delivers less accurate colour than we would have hoped, given its VA panel technology. However, it offers excellent viewing angles and very high contrast and responds well to calibration if you're looking for a budget 27in display for photographic work. Despite its flaws it's a big step up from any TN panel for any non-gamer who doesn't need the absolute fastest response times available.

Find the best price