The CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750 is a highly customisable system that’s clearly aimed at gamers, modders and overclockers who know that if you’re willing to take some risks, performance doesn’t have to cost the earth.

The CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750 uses an Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 and a 512MB GeForce 8600 GT to provide excellent system performance and good gaming power for such a low-cost PC.

But if you want to push things further, CyberPower offers a range of overclocking options. The CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750 system we tested ships with its front-side bus overclocked from 1,333MHz up to 1,600MHz. In this configuration, the processor still runs at 3GHz but managed to eke out an extra WorldBench point.

Readers wishing to use this configuration and gain these fairly minor performance gains should tick the ‘PC Advisor’ box when purchasing the system online. Greater overclocking options are available for an additional fee. We’ve seen the kind of performance gains these can achieve and they’re very impressive indeed.

Less impressive, unfortunately, is the CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750's Hanton H340WDS flat-panel. The unit itself is reasonably smart, but image quality isn’t up to the task of serious photo editing or multimedia use. The 8ms response time is fine for gaming, though. The controls are difficult and cumbersome, while the built-in speakers provide a less than immersive experience. Other than this component, however, the CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750 is a decent system.

Verdict

It's two months old, but we still rate the CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750. And if you're a fan of overclocking, you will too.

Budget desktop PCs chart ranking (July 08 issue)


  1. Arbico Elite 8400
  2. Chillblast Fusion Rogue
  3. Mesh Delta GT
  4. CyberPower Gamer Ultra 930
  5. CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750

See also: Budget desktop PCs buying advice

CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750: our first look

Budget desktop PC buying advice (July 08 issue)

Processor: You’re not going to get the fastest processors at this price, but there are some excellent, affordable chips around if you can find them. Intel’s Core 2 Duo E8400 is a stand-out component and dominates the charts quite convincingly.

We’re also now seeing some quad-core processors in this price range, in the form of the Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 and AMD’s latest Phenom X4 9550.

Don’t be tempted to buy older Intel Pentium D chips – their performance is a long way behind today’s Core 2 Duos.

Memory: In this Vista-dominated age, 2GB has almost become a requirement. You may be able to make do with 1GB, but we wouldn’t recommend it.

Check you’re getting the full benefit of the memory – some onboard graphics controllers use system memory, which will slow things down. Also check your motherboard has some free memory slots if you plan to upgrade later.

Storage: You can never have too much storage space. Digital media content such as video and music files will quickly fill a reasonably sized hard drive, so buy the biggest you can. A 250GB drive is a good investment, although hard-drive space is relatively easy to add later. If you’re planning on upgrading hard drives internally, make sure you’ve got enough free drive bays in your system case.

Look for a DVD drive that can write to the -R/+R formats at 16-speed or better. If you want to copy 8.5GB at once, get a drive that can write to DVD-R DL and +R DL at 12- and eight-speed respectively.

Flat-panel: Compromises have to be made to keep the price of a PC down, and the monitor is often where the sacrifices start. Just remember that this is the part of the PC you’re going to be spending most of your time looking at.

All the PCs in our chart come with flat-panels. The most common size is 19in – be careful when considering larger monitors because the quality is unlikely to be good enough at this price. We don’t see many CRTs, but they’re still a pretty good deal – provided you can put up with the bulky casing, colour depth tends to be better than with flat-panels.

Graphics cards: Given that the best graphics cards can retail for £300 or £400, fervent gamers are unlikely to be best served by a sub-£500 PC. Nonetheless, the cream of the crop tend to come with decent cards.

You should still be looking for PCs that can produce 50 frames per second (fps) if you’re going to be playing games – 70fps or 80fps is better still. The fastest chip in this price range is currently the GeForce 8800GS, but including one of these may require compromises elsewhere.

The GeForce 8600s are a good alternative. They can support DirectX 10.0, but they’re unlikely to be powerful enough to make the most of tomorrow’s DirectX 10.0 games. They’ve got plenty of pace to tackle today’s games.

Sound card and speakers: You’re unlikely to get a standalone sound card at this price – it’s an area where most vendors try to cut costs. Most motherboards have decent built-in audio chips that can handle six-channel sound – but to get the best out of them you’ll need a 5.1 system (five speakers and a subwoofer).

Unfortunately, there’s a good chance you won’t get anything better than a 2.1 system in this category – indeed, you won’t necessarily get a subwoofer or speakers at all.

Our first look

CyberPower’s Gamer Infinity 750 is a highly customisable system that you configure online. Our review model uses the striking Sigma LaVie case, finished in bright yellow and black with leather effect trim, a transparent side panel and fluorescent blue illumination.

With these looks, the CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750 is a system that’s clearly aimed at gamers, modders and overclockers – the sort of buyers who know that If you’re willing to take some risks, performance doesn’t have to cost the earth.

Like the Arbico CD8400 XL, the CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750 uses an Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 processor and a GeForce 8600GT 512MB graphics card. System performance is excellent and gaming framerates are good for a low-cost system.

CyberPower offers a range of overclocking options to push your PC to the limit. The system we tested ships with its front-side bus overclocked from the standard 1,333MHz up to 1,600MHz, as supported by the MSI P35 Neo-F P35 motherboard. PC Advisor readers wishing to take advantage of this need to tick the ‘PC Advisor’ box when purchasing the CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750 online.

In this case, the CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750's performance gains were minimal, but greater overclocking options are available for an additional fee and are covered by CyberPower’s year-long warranty. We’ve seen the kind of performance gains these can achieve and they’re very impressive indeed.

The Hanton flat-panel display is less pleasing. It looks smart but is let down by its specification and the cumbersome controls. Its 8ms response time is fine for gaming, but the picture quality isn’t good enough for serious image editing or multimedia use. The built-in speakers, too, could be better.

Budget PCs chart ranking (May issue)


  1. Arbico CD8400 XL
  2. CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750
  3. Eclipse Matrix A64N88GS
  4. Zoostorm 4-2354
  5. Arbico CD6570 SX

Verdict

While some components could be improved upon, its sheer power makes the CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750 an excellent system for the money.

NEXT PAGE: Budget PCs buying advice > >

Budget PCs buying advice (May issue)

Processor: You’re not going to get the fastest processors at this price, but many of today’s chips are powerful enough to make light work of standard applications – and there are some excellent, affordable processors around if you can find them.

Intel’s Core 2 Duo E8400 is a stand-out component. For the first time we’ve seen a quad-core CPU in this price range: the Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600. The Athlon 64 X2 6400+ is also an option, although it currently can’t match the Intel processors on general performance.

Don’t be fooled into buying an Intel Pentium D. They have dual-core capabilities, but their performance is a long way behind the Core 2 Duo range.

Memory: In this Vista-dominated age, 2GB has almost become a requirement. You may be able to make do with 1GB, but we wouldn’t recommend it. Check you’re getting the full benefit of the memory – some onboard graphics controllers use system memory, which will ultimately slow down your system.

Storage: You can never have too much storage space. Digital media content such as video and music files will quickly fill a reasonably sized hard drive, so buy the biggest you can. A 250GB drive is a good investment, although hard-drive space is relatively easy to add at a later date.

Look for a DVD burner that can write to the –R/+R formats at 16-speed or more. If you want to copy up to 8.5GB at once, look for DVD-R DL or +R DL. Write speeds on these tend to be lower, but you should look for an absolute minimum of six-speed. Realistically, you ought to be aiming for eight-speed.

Flat-panel: Compromises have to be made to keep the price of a PC down, and the monitor is often where the sacrifices start. Just remember that this is the part of the PC you’re going to be spending most of your time looking at.

All the PCs in our charts now come with flat-panels. The most common size is 19in – be very careful when considering going above this size, because the quality is unlikely to be good enough under these price constraints. We don’t see many CRTs now, but they’re still a pretty good deal if you can find them – provided you can put up with the bulky casing, the colour depth on these displays tends to be better than you get on flat-panels.

Graphics cards: Given that the best graphics cards can retail for £300 or £400, fervent gamers are unlikely to be best served by a sub-£500 PC. Nonetheless, the cream of the crop generally come with decent cards.

You should be looking for PCs that can produce 50 frames per second (fps) if you’re going to be playing games – 70fps or 80fps is better still. Currently, the fastest chip in this price range is the GeForce 8800GS, but including one may require compromises elsewhere.

The GeForce 8600s are a good alternative. They can support DirectX 10.0, although they’re unlikely to be powerful enough to make the most of tomorrow’s DirectX 10.x games. They have plenty of pace for today’s games.

Sound card and speakers: You’re unlikely to get a standalone sound card at this price. Most motherboards have decent built-in audio chips that can handle six-channel sound, but to get the best out of them you’ll need a 5.1 speaker system. Unfortunately, you may not be able to get anything better than a 2.1 system in this category – you won’t necessarily get a subwoofer or speakers at all.

See also:

CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750: expert review

Budget PCs chart ranking

CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750: Specs

  • 3GHz Intel Core 2 Duo E8400
  • Windows Vista Home Premium
  • 2GB DDR RAM
  • 160GB SATA
  • MSI P35 Neo-F P35
  • 6 x USB
  • 19in Hanton H340WDS (0.285mm pixel pitch
  • 1,440x900 max resolution @75Hz)
  • 512MB PCI Express Xpert Vision nVidia GeForce 8600 GT
  • onboard Intel ICH7
  • speakers built into flat-panel
  • subwoofer
  • max DVD speeds: 20x/20x/12x/8x/16x (DVD-R/+R/-R DL/+R DL/-ROM)
  • one-year return-to-base warranty
  • WorldBench 6 score: 117
  • 3GHz Intel Core 2 Duo E8400
  • Windows Vista Home Premium
  • 2GB DDR RAM
  • 160GB SATA
  • MSI P35 Neo-F P35
  • 6 x USB
  • 19in Hanton H340WDS (0.285mm pixel pitch
  • 1,440x900 max resolution @75Hz)
  • 512MB PCI Express Xpert Vision nVidia GeForce 8600 GT
  • onboard Intel ICH7
  • speakers built into flat-panel
  • subwoofer
  • max DVD speeds: 20x/20x/12x/8x/16x (DVD-R/+R/-R DL/+R DL/-ROM)
  • one-year return-to-base warranty
  • WorldBench 6 score: 117

OUR VERDICT

It's two months old, but we still rate the CyberPower Gamer Infinity 750. And if you're a fan of overclocking, you will too.

Find the best price