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More Tech Industry Opinion

  • Opinion: RIM Owns Up To Fake Apple Protest in Australia

    Research In Motion admitted Tuesday that it was behind a staged protest outside a Sydney, Australia Apple Store last week.

  • Opinion: Barnes & Noble Deal Signals New Microsoft Savvy

    Microsoft's new found friendship with Barnes & Noble reveals that the Redmond brain trust may finally be wrapping its mind around the dynamics of the mobile market.

  • Opinion: Proposed Bill Would Protect Employees' Facebook Passwords

    A bill that would stop employers from requesting future hires' social networking passwords has been filed in the U.S. House of Representatives.

  • Opinion: CISPA Passes The House: What You Need to Know

    The U.S. House of Representatives passed the Cyber Information and Security Protection Act late Thursday despite concerns over user privacy, the specter of SOPA/PIPA, and a veto threat from the Obama administration. The idea behind CISPA is to empower the government and corporations to work together to better protect American infrastructure from foreign attacks. But many civil liberties groups say the bill is too broad and threatens user privacy.

  • Opinion: Intel SSD 330 joins the race to the bottom

    Not that long ago, SSDs in general and Intel SSDs in particular cost a pretty penny. Things are changing though, especially now that Intel has released the Intel SSD 330, a very affordable SSD, with a price well below £1 per GB.

  • Opinion: Apple is Headed for a Fall, Says Forrester CEO

    Never mind the blowout numbers announced Tuesday. Apple's best days are behind it.

  • Opinion: CISPA Monitoring Bill: Changes Proposed, but Unlikely to Pacify Critics

    Lawmakers are proposing changes to the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, or CISPA, that would help prevent the government and businesses from running amok with personal data.

  • Opinion: Wal-Mart Launches Vudu Disc-to-Digital Store Program: Here's How It Works

    Want to turn your bulging library of digital video discs into high-definition video streams that you can access anytime without spending a fortune?

  • Opinion: Despite Denial, Apple Dictated E-Book Pricing at iBookstore

    Apple has finally broken its near-silence on the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) lawsuit against it and a half dozen publishers for conspiring to fix-prices on e-books.

  • Opinion: Ultrabooks: trying to catch Apple four years after the MacBook Air

    Intel's promotion of Ultrabooks four years after the launch of the MacBook Air may help to explain why Apple is now a $600bn company.

  • Opinion: Some Publishers Quickly Settle E-book Price-Fixing Lawsuit

    Within hours of an anti-trust lawsuit filed against some of the largest trade book publishers in the United States and Apple for fixing the prices on e-books, three of publishers have settled their involvement in the case with the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ).

  • Opinion: Why Facebook bought Instagram for a billion dollars

    When news broke Monday regarding Facebook's eye-popping $1 billion acquisition of mobile photo sharing network Instagram, I experienced a variety of immediate reactions:

  • Opinion: Using Creative Commons to Find Photos You Can Use

    Photos and the Internet go together like peanut butter and jelly. For as long as there have been web browsers, people have generously posted photos online--which other people have then downloaded and used for their own purposes, whether or not they've actually asked for permission. To make it easier to legally and ethically reuse photos posted online, the Creative Commons license was created. I first mentioned Creative Commons in "Your Photos, Your Rights, and the Law." This week let's learn a little more about Creative Commons--both how you can use it to share your own photos and how to use other peoples' works.

  • Opinion: AOL Patents: What's in it for Microsoft?

    AOL announced that it has closed a deal to sell more than 800 patents to Microsoft. The deal is just north of a billion dollars, and it's easy to see why AOL might want to cash in on the intellectual property. What is less clear is why Microsoft is interested in the patent portfolio, or what Microsoft gains from the deal.

  • Opinion: You're Spending Less on Tech

    Trying to cut tech-related expenses? You're not alone. The average U.S. household spent $961 on consumer electronics over the past 12 months, down more than $200 from last year, according to a new Consumer Electronics Association study.

  • Opinion: 4 Ways to Become a True Social Business

    You and I may be fully participating in popular social media like Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter, but I'll bet your company isn't -- at least as well as it could be. While these networks have exploded over the last few years for personal use (Facebook with 800 million users, Twitter with 175 million, and LinkedIn with 115 million), most businesses are at a loss for effective ways to engage with customers in this brave new world. And social media growth is showing no signs of slowing; newer networks such as Google+, Pinterest and Instagram have seen incredible growth in a matter of weeks.

  • Opinion: Dell Buys Wyse to Continue Evolution to 'Not Really a PC Company'

    Last month Michael Dell let the world know that Dell is “not really a PC company.” Today, Dell announced that it has reached an agreement with Wyse that extends Dell’s portfolio of products and services even further beyond the traditional PC market.

  • Opinion: iPhone 4 Antenna Settlement: Some Can Collect $15

    There are apparently two kinds of lotteries in the United States: state-owned ones like MegaMillions, and class-action lawsuits. Your chances of big payments from both of them are approximately the same: small.

  • Opinion: How Tech Patent Lawsuits Hurt Real People

    Semantic Compaction Systems is suing a small augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) iPad app company called Speak for Yourself, alleging patent infringement. Another day, another lawsuit--right?

  • Opinion: How to Start a New Business on the Cheap, Part 1

    A million-dollar idea may not cost you anything, but building a business around one definitely isn't free. Heck, it sometimes seems like it takes a million bucks just to develop your idea.


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