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More Tech Industry Opinion

  • Opinion: Publisher Settles in E-book Price Fixing Case

    Another publisher has settled with the states in a case involving e-book price fixing.

  • Opinion: Four Challenges Facebook will Face After the IPO

    When Facebook goes public, it will enter a new world full of shareholder meetings, earnings reports, and the constant pressure to turn an increasingly bigger profit. But the Facebook IPO isn't just about making money; it's also about expanding the network, in pursuit of Mark Zuckerberg's vision of a more connected world. With that in mind, here are four challenges Facebook will face after its public offering is complete:

  • Opinion: Apple E-Book Lawsuit: Steve Jobs Swayed Publisher, Complaint Alleges

    Apple cofounder Steve Jobs got directly involved in an alleged conspiracy to fix e-book prices after a publisher balked at participating in the scheme, according to a court document filed by 31 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

  • Opinion: Your next IT generation

    In the MTR carriage or walking down the street, eyes glued to the screen...punching buttons or controlling cartoon birds, they seem oblivious to their "meatspace" situations. Does a pregnant woman need the MTR seat a screen-puncher's occupying? He or she wouldn't know--their collective brain's in Birdland.

  • Opinion: Verizon Defends Customer Privacy in Publisher's Suit

    Verizon is fighting a move by a book publisher to obtain personal information on ten of its customers accused of illegally sharing electronic copies of books in the popular "Dummy" self-help series.

  • Opinion: Four Ways to Celebrate 'Day Against DRM' Today

    Almost a full year has passed since I last wrote about Digital Rights Management (DRM), but the restrictive technology continues to plague users around the globe. To help bring attention to the ongoing negative consequences of DRM, the Free Software Foundation has declared Friday this year's International Day Against DRM.

  • Opinion: RIM Owns Up To Fake Apple Protest in Australia

    Research In Motion admitted Tuesday that it was behind a staged protest outside a Sydney, Australia Apple Store last week.

  • Opinion: Barnes & Noble Deal Signals New Microsoft Savvy

    Microsoft's new found friendship with Barnes & Noble reveals that the Redmond brain trust may finally be wrapping its mind around the dynamics of the mobile market.

  • Opinion: Proposed Bill Would Protect Employees' Facebook Passwords

    A bill that would stop employers from requesting future hires' social networking passwords has been filed in the U.S. House of Representatives.

  • Opinion: CISPA Passes The House: What You Need to Know

    The U.S. House of Representatives passed the Cyber Information and Security Protection Act late Thursday despite concerns over user privacy, the specter of SOPA/PIPA, and a veto threat from the Obama administration. The idea behind CISPA is to empower the government and corporations to work together to better protect American infrastructure from foreign attacks. But many civil liberties groups say the bill is too broad and threatens user privacy.

  • Opinion: Intel SSD 330 joins the race to the bottom

    Not that long ago, SSDs in general and Intel SSDs in particular cost a pretty penny. Things are changing though, especially now that Intel has released the Intel SSD 330, a very affordable SSD, with a price well below £1 per GB.

  • Opinion: Apple is Headed for a Fall, Says Forrester CEO

    Never mind the blowout numbers announced Tuesday. Apple's best days are behind it.

  • Opinion: CISPA Monitoring Bill: Changes Proposed, but Unlikely to Pacify Critics

    Lawmakers are proposing changes to the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, or CISPA, that would help prevent the government and businesses from running amok with personal data.

  • Opinion: Wal-Mart Launches Vudu Disc-to-Digital Store Program: Here's How It Works

    Want to turn your bulging library of digital video discs into high-definition video streams that you can access anytime without spending a fortune?

  • Opinion: Despite Denial, Apple Dictated E-Book Pricing at iBookstore

    Apple has finally broken its near-silence on the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) lawsuit against it and a half dozen publishers for conspiring to fix-prices on e-books.

  • Opinion: Ultrabooks: trying to catch Apple four years after the MacBook Air

    Intel's promotion of Ultrabooks four years after the launch of the MacBook Air may help to explain why Apple is now a $600bn company.

  • Opinion: Some Publishers Quickly Settle E-book Price-Fixing Lawsuit

    Within hours of an anti-trust lawsuit filed against some of the largest trade book publishers in the United States and Apple for fixing the prices on e-books, three of publishers have settled their involvement in the case with the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ).

  • Opinion: Why Facebook bought Instagram for a billion dollars

    When news broke Monday regarding Facebook's eye-popping $1 billion acquisition of mobile photo sharing network Instagram, I experienced a variety of immediate reactions:

  • Opinion: Using Creative Commons to Find Photos You Can Use

    Photos and the Internet go together like peanut butter and jelly. For as long as there have been web browsers, people have generously posted photos online--which other people have then downloaded and used for their own purposes, whether or not they've actually asked for permission. To make it easier to legally and ethically reuse photos posted online, the Creative Commons license was created. I first mentioned Creative Commons in "Your Photos, Your Rights, and the Law." This week let's learn a little more about Creative Commons--both how you can use it to share your own photos and how to use other peoples' works.

  • Opinion: AOL Patents: What's in it for Microsoft?

    AOL announced that it has closed a deal to sell more than 800 patents to Microsoft. The deal is just north of a billion dollars, and it's easy to see why AOL might want to cash in on the intellectual property. What is less clear is why Microsoft is interested in the patent portfolio, or what Microsoft gains from the deal.



IDG UK Sites

Nokia replaces budget Lumia 520 with 530: Release date, price and specs

IDG UK Sites

Q3 2014 financial results: Apple announces record June quarter, 35.2m iPhones sold, $37.4b revenue

IDG UK Sites

Welcome to the upgrade cycle - you'll never leave

IDG UK Sites

How to make an 'Apple iWatch' using an iPod nano and a 3D printer