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Latest Tech Industry Opinion

  • Opinion: Where will Google, Apple and Microsoft go next?

    Google, Microsoft, and Apple have all made their major operating system announcements for the year. We look at where they are focusing, and how this could affect the way we think and make our decisions regarding everyday technology

  • Opinion: Court ignores Fox's Aereo argument, rejects request to stop Dish Anywhere

    Fox may have been able to get the courts to knock out Aereo's streaming TV service. But Dish Network is proving to be a decidedly formidable adversary.

  • Opinion: Why there won't be a Nexus 7 2014

    We all expect a Nexus 8 to launch at some stage this summer, and that is likely to mean curtains for the excellent Nexus 7 tablet. Here's why there won't be a Nexus 7 2014.

  • Opinion: Obama has big options for green card, H-1B reform without Congress

    With Congress refusing to move on immigration reform, President Barack Obama has options that could have broad impacts on immigration generally, and on the H-1B and green card visa systems in particular.

  • Opinion: Cord cutters, beware: AT&T's DirecTV buy affects you, too

    Having cut the cable cord, you may glance at the current landscape of big cable providers snapping up slightly-less-big-though-still-large rivals and decide that these megadeals have nothing to do with you. After all, you're getting your entertainment from other sources--over-the-air antennas, online streaming services, and the like. What's it matter to you if AT&T buys up DirecTV or Comcast absorbs Time Warner Cable?

  • Opinion: 1 in 5 small businesses still use Windows XP, survey says

    A survey by antivirus firm Bitdefender finds that 18% of small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) are still using Windows XP despite the end of support from Microsoft and the near-apocalyptic predictions that led up to its end of life.

  • Opinion: Amazon's Fire Phone shows that Kindle Fire failed

    The Amazon Fire Phone launch tells us that technology's most disruptive company is caught in too minds. The Kindle Fire must be failing, and the Fire Phone starts out on shaky ground.

  • Opinion: Amazon smartphone launch: What to expect

    We take a look at three things to expect from today's Amazon smartphone launch and two not to pin your hopes on.

  • Opinion: Study: The traditional office will soon be extinct

    It's not news that mobility is one of the major driving forces in IT today. Smartphones and tablets continue to supplant traditional PCs as primary computing devices, as people are getting more done from wherever they happen to be. A new study from Aruba Networks found that the demand for mobile productivity also puts significant stress on IT personnel and budgets.

  • Opinion: 5 iOS 8 features Apple stole from Android

    Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, and with iOS 8 Apple really wants to flatter Android. Here are five features in iOS 8 that Apple stole from Android.

  • Opinion: Snowden versus James Bond

    The media spotlight hit Hong Kong last year when former government contractor Edward J Snowden spilled the beans on the NSA's extensive spying program. The youthful tech guru then hightailed it to Russia, where he remains. In April, the Washington Post and Guardian US won the Pulitzer Prize for public service, one of journalism's more prestigious awards, for their articles based on NSA documents leaked by Snowden.

  • Opinion: Ballin' like Ballmer: 9 other tech luminaries who could buy an NBA team

    It seems that newly retired Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is trading in Clippy for the Los Angeles Clippers.

  • Opinion: What will consumers gain from AT&T's DirecTV buy?

    It's official: AT&T wants to buy DirecTV in a deal valued at around $48.5 billion. And to help the acquisition's public appeal, the telecommunications giant is offering a number of sweeteners.

  • Opinion: On second thought, California Senate backs kill-switch bill

    We're a step closer to having kill-switch technology built into our smartphones by default, after the California State Senate approved a bill that would mandate the antitheft feature come preinstalled on phones sold in the Golden State.

  • Opinion: Facebook's winning streak continues with another $2.5 billion quarter

    At this point, it would be more surprising if Facebook wasn't making billions from ads.

  • Opinion: Airbnb preps for New York court battle by scrubbing site of 'bad actors'

    Airbnb meets New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman in an Albany court Tuesday afternoon armed with economic stats, tales of hosts just barely scraping by, and a site freshly wiped of more than 2,000 NYC listings.

  • Opinion: Google and Viacom settle YouTube suit long after it stopped mattering

    Google and Viacom have finally buried the hatchet over alleged YouTube copyright violations from nearly a decade ago.

  • Opinion: What I learned from a shoeless Mark Cuban at SXSW

    The One World Theatre is not a typical South by Southwest venue. It sits high on a hill northwest of town, about nine miles from the convention center, with beautiful views and none of the overcrowded messiness of the show itself. On Saturday, Dallas Mavericks owner and Shark Tank star Mark Cuban spoke to about 300 entrepreneurs here--members and guests of Entrepreneurs Organization's Austin branch. Tagging along were a few lucky members of the media--including me.

  • Opinion: Why Lenovo has bought Motorola

    Yesterday Lenovo agreed to buy Motorola from Google for US$2.91bn. On the face of it that's a big loss for Google given that it spent $12.5bn buying Motorola only in 2011. So what's going on? Here I'll take a look at why Lenovo has bought Motorola, why Google has sold it, and what it means for Android and the smartphone market.

  • Opinion: Court's smackdown on net neutrality could hit you right in the pocket

    The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals struck down most of the FCC's 2010 Open Internet Order on Tuesday, rejecting the FCC's power to impose and enforce network neutrality rules on Internet service providers (ISPs).

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