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More Software Opinion

  • Opinion: Bugs & Fixes: QuickBooks 2014 repairs this and that

    Exactly how does a company go through four releases before the year its software is named for has even arrived? Lots of fixes is something that happens regularly with Quickbooks: R4 was released on December 12, 2013, with numerous bug fixes (advanced pricing and inventory receiving) and some small performance improvements, while Quickbooks 2013 was at a whopping 12 releases last time we checked.

  • Opinion: Bugs & Fixes: Microsoft covers remote-code execution hole in Word and Office Web Apps

    Th only thing unusual about this month's Microsoft security patches is that one of them, MS14-001 that could allow remote code execution in Word and Office Web Apps. A rarely discussed issue with cloud-based computing is the potential for truly widespread mayhem, averted in this case. Other Microsoft fixes include MS14-003 for the XP/Server 2013 kernel (elevation of privilege) and roughly the same deal for the Window 7/Server 2008 kernel (MS14-004).

  • Opinion: Ouch: HP brings Windows 7 'back by popular demand'

    With Windows 8 bearing a good share of the blame for the declining PC market, HP is falling back on Windows 7 for its latest marketing push. The world's second largest computer maker recently began promoting PCs loaded with Windows 7 on its U.S. website, buoyed by an email marketing push.

  • Opinion: Master SMS with these 9 basic texting tips

    Nobody uses phones as phones anymore.

  • Opinion: Kill your data dead with these tips and tools

    There are lots of ways to obliterate sensitive data from of your drive: blast furnaces, degaussers (magnet field generators), sledgehammers, and secure-deletion software among them. These tools vary in effectiveness--especially as applied variously to hard drives, solid-state drives, and USB flash drives--and in the subsequent usability of the drive.

  • Opinion: Auto-tune your karaoke sessions with Singtrix

    Karaoke is incredibly fun--if you can sing. Actually, it's fun either way, but the vocally challenged among us (myself included) could use a little push to get up on stage. And since you can't hog the mic all night, wouldn't it be nice if other people's crooning magically sounded better too?

  • Opinion: Cruise with Ozobot, a tiny robot that races across your iPad

    The Ozobot, a new intelligent game piece for the iPad, is really, really good at following directions: He never wanders off, turns around when you tell him to, and can change pace quickly. Perhaps that's why they were such a hit at CES, where they made their public debut.

  • Opinion: T-Mobile buys a bunch of unused Verizon spectrum around major cities

    While T-Mobile and AT&T engage in a delightfully public PR urination competition, the wireless industry still trudges along. Verizon announced Monday that it had agreed to sell a block of unused spectrum to T-Mo in exchange for cash and spectrum licenses.

  • Opinion: Why Snapchat will never be worth $3 billion

    It was the number that ricocheted across the Internet, a number so large it couldn't be real: 3 billion. Dollars. In cash. Facebook reportedly offered that tidy sum for Snapchat, the disappearing-message app that has become tech's most sought-after startup.

  • Opinion: Mobile device rudeness

    Consider this: a group of friends gather socially. They're interacting, not taking mobile snaps of their cocktails and Facebooking them off to "friends" who aren't friends. They're socializing in person--at a restaurant or similar establishment. Actual conversation takes place.

  • Opinion: Sonar X3's third fix is the charm

    Sonar X3 is a high-end audio recording application that's recently experienced what's known in the software business as an Oracle-style release. That's when you take the customer's money, ship them what is essentially a buggy beta, then strive to fix things and update them as fast as you can. This was the MO for Oracle (and others less well-known) for years early on, hence the name.

  • Opinion: Ride the rails with Pocket Trains

    I'll be very upfront about this: I have invested more time than is probably healthy playing mobile games from NimbleBit.

  • Opinion: Motorola, HTC, and Google announce a bowlful of new KitKat upgrades

    So, we weren't lying yesterday when we pointed out that the Moto X (on Verizon) would get Kitkat before the stockilicious Nexus 4. We just weren't aware of how close to the wire we would be.

  • Opinion: Hands-on with Firefox's revamped 'Australis' interface

    We got our first peek at Australis, Mozilla's upcoming interface overhaul, in April 2012. Since then, pieces of Australis pieces have slowly worked their way into the latest versions of Firefox, like the new-look downloads arrow. Earlier this week, however, Mozilla finally brought the bulk of the new Australis aesthetic into the nightly preview builds of the popular open source browser.

  • Opinion: Dash turns dining out into a Seamless experience

    A night out a bar or restaurant in a city like New York usually ends in frustration--flagging down a server or bartender to get the check or close your tab can take an excruciatingly long time, plus you still have a long train or cab ride ahead of you. And the temperatures are dropping outside. It's almost more than one person can take. Really.

  • Opinion: Declutter your PC for better security and more storage

    A cluttered hard drive can be disorderly and slow, but it can also be a security hazard. This is especially true of any software on your PC that you rarely, if ever, use. Perhaps you installed a free demo, or you completed a game and you'll never touch it again.

  • Opinion: Stealth Inc. finally brings its speedy brand of subterfuge to iOS

    Oh man do I love stealth games. There's something a little magical about lurking in the shadows, picking locks or hacking nondescript terminals and spending inordinate amounts of time crawling through tight spaces. That thoughtful pace, the careful observation of your surroundings, getting the jump on the opposition: great fun if you're the sort of person who enjoys biding their time. For others it's likely an interactive-ish analog of watching paint dry.

  • Opinion: 7 apps for ordering photo prints from your phone

    The instant gratification of digital photos cannot be overstated. You take a picture and boom, you can see it! You can tell right away if the lighting was horrible or the person had his eyes closed, and retake until it's perfect. It's so much better than the old way of shooting 24 frames of film and not knowing what you had until you got those expensive prints back from the lab.

  • Opinion: Make meetings matter with the right tools

    Meetings suck because we let them. Every day, we huddle in conference rooms for team updates, strategy sessions, or old-school brainstorming. But if we don't take our meetings seriously--if we ignore what participants ask or say, fail to document the meeting's takeaways, or forget to follow up afterward--they might as well not have happened.

  • Opinion: Bugs and Fixes: Firefox 25 fixes security holes and adds web audio

    Securing browsers is a full-time occupation, and someone (likely a small army of them) was busy at Mozilla before releasing Firefox 25 on October 29th. The bugs fixed relate to Javascript PDF usage, spoofing the address bar, image decoding, the offline cache, and various memory hazards (e.g. null pointers, non-deallocated blocks). Version 25 also adds a much needed gaming feature: Web Audio. The JavaScript interface to HTML 5 audio is now fully supported.



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