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More Software Opinion

  • Opinion: Mobile device rudeness

    Consider this: a group of friends gather socially. They're interacting, not taking mobile snaps of their cocktails and Facebooking them off to "friends" who aren't friends. They're socializing in person--at a restaurant or similar establishment. Actual conversation takes place.

  • Opinion: Sonar X3's third fix is the charm

    Sonar X3 is a high-end audio recording application that's recently experienced what's known in the software business as an Oracle-style release. That's when you take the customer's money, ship them what is essentially a buggy beta, then strive to fix things and update them as fast as you can. This was the MO for Oracle (and others less well-known) for years early on, hence the name.

  • Opinion: Ride the rails with Pocket Trains

    I'll be very upfront about this: I have invested more time than is probably healthy playing mobile games from NimbleBit.

  • Opinion: Motorola, HTC, and Google announce a bowlful of new KitKat upgrades

    So, we weren't lying yesterday when we pointed out that the Moto X (on Verizon) would get Kitkat before the stockilicious Nexus 4. We just weren't aware of how close to the wire we would be.

  • Opinion: Hands-on with Firefox's revamped 'Australis' interface

    We got our first peek at Australis, Mozilla's upcoming interface overhaul, in April 2012. Since then, pieces of Australis pieces have slowly worked their way into the latest versions of Firefox, like the new-look downloads arrow. Earlier this week, however, Mozilla finally brought the bulk of the new Australis aesthetic into the nightly preview builds of the popular open source browser.

  • Opinion: Dash turns dining out into a Seamless experience

    A night out a bar or restaurant in a city like New York usually ends in frustration--flagging down a server or bartender to get the check or close your tab can take an excruciatingly long time, plus you still have a long train or cab ride ahead of you. And the temperatures are dropping outside. It's almost more than one person can take. Really.

  • Opinion: Declutter your PC for better security and more storage

    A cluttered hard drive can be disorderly and slow, but it can also be a security hazard. This is especially true of any software on your PC that you rarely, if ever, use. Perhaps you installed a free demo, or you completed a game and you'll never touch it again.

  • Opinion: Stealth Inc. finally brings its speedy brand of subterfuge to iOS

    Oh man do I love stealth games. There's something a little magical about lurking in the shadows, picking locks or hacking nondescript terminals and spending inordinate amounts of time crawling through tight spaces. That thoughtful pace, the careful observation of your surroundings, getting the jump on the opposition: great fun if you're the sort of person who enjoys biding their time. For others it's likely an interactive-ish analog of watching paint dry.

  • Opinion: 7 apps for ordering photo prints from your phone

    The instant gratification of digital photos cannot be overstated. You take a picture and boom, you can see it! You can tell right away if the lighting was horrible or the person had his eyes closed, and retake until it's perfect. It's so much better than the old way of shooting 24 frames of film and not knowing what you had until you got those expensive prints back from the lab.

  • Opinion: Make meetings matter with the right tools

    Meetings suck because we let them. Every day, we huddle in conference rooms for team updates, strategy sessions, or old-school brainstorming. But if we don't take our meetings seriously--if we ignore what participants ask or say, fail to document the meeting's takeaways, or forget to follow up afterward--they might as well not have happened.

  • Opinion: Bugs and Fixes: Firefox 25 fixes security holes and adds web audio

    Securing browsers is a full-time occupation, and someone (likely a small army of them) was busy at Mozilla before releasing Firefox 25 on October 29th. The bugs fixed relate to Javascript PDF usage, spoofing the address bar, image decoding, the offline cache, and various memory hazards (e.g. null pointers, non-deallocated blocks). Version 25 also adds a much needed gaming feature: Web Audio. The JavaScript interface to HTML 5 audio is now fully supported.

  • Opinion: Stop the Shockwave Flash Chrome crash

    M A Hameed has a Chrome problem. Web pages suddenly die in Chrome with "Shockwave flash has crashed" messages.

  • Opinion: 'Disarming Corruptor' disguises 3D printing designs to fight The Man

    3D printing promises a glorious future, one where you'll be able to create and manufacture nearly anything you can think of right from the comfort of your own home. But the future potential of 3D printing isn't limited by your imagination alone: The law is tossing up barriers for the nascent technology.

  • Opinion: Don't fear the fun tax, and try Dead Trigger 2

    I'll admit, I've never really been sold on Dead Trigger. It combined two things I've grown weary of--the undead and mobile first-person shooters--into a package that was amicable enough, but never quite set my world on fire. To its credit, it did serve as a sort of de facto performance benchmark for tablets and smartphones, and was one of those titles (alongside Infinity Blade II, or Shadowgun) that reminded folks these touchscreen devices could crank out some awfully pretty games.

  • Opinion: How Cloud Computing Puts Adverse Selection in Its Place

    For years, operations departments have used adverse selection principles to allocate resources, often deeming small projects unworthy of enterprise computing power. Today, though, the cloud makes computing so cheap that there's no reason to deny any project, no matter how small. Doing so will simply push users to the public cloud -- and beyond IT's control.

  • Opinion: The White House cares about games, but not for the reasons you think

    Mark DeLoura, the White House's Senior Advisor for Digital Media, expounded on the government's games policies at the Gamesbeat 2013 conference Tuesday, focusing on education and the game industry's problem with "perceptions."

  • Opinion: Grid Diary makes keeping a journal as easy as filling out a form

    Diaries are not just for preteen girls. OK, something like this, with the Lisa Frank-esque graphics and the heart-shaped padlock and the glitter--oh, the glitter--that is for preteen girls. But just the act of writing in a diary every day, that's good for everyone.

  • Opinion: The mysterious ~$ files--nothing to worry about

    Lillian Lim noticed strange files appearing and disappearing. The file names always begin with ~$.

  • Opinion: Manage Cloud Computing With Policies, Not Permissions

    Cloud computing obsolesces the idea that IT operations must put users through the ringer to get their hands on scarce resources. Many organizations continue to insist that someone must review resource requests when, in reality, an automated policy engine can do the same thing -- and put computing power in users' hands that much faster.

  • Opinion: The future of video games will be in your browser

    I've had it with interminable game downloads--and you can keep your fancy new Xbox, PlayStation, and Wii consoles. The future of PC gaming is in the browser, and it'll be here sooner than you expect.



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