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More Social Networks Opinion

  • Opinion: Hands on with Facebook's Slingshot, yet another messaging app: Meh

    Facebook didn't dig too deeply to innovate on Snapchat's ephemeral messaging premise with its new iOS and Android app Slingshot, but the network's latest teen-friendly effort has a twist: Before you can read a message, you have to send one.

  • Opinion: Facebook Messenger adds videos, extra-large thumbs up

    Facebook has only made its Messenger app more robust since buying WhatsApp earlier this year. Once just a basic messaging app, Messenger has expanded beyond basic chats with stickers, group conversations, and now video messages.

  • Opinion: Path just deleted all your old messages, if you care

    Path just made all your messages disappear. The social networking app, which was long ago called the "anti-Facebook" for its friend list limitations, has pivoted to Snapchat-like ephemeral messaging.

  • Opinion: Secret's 'dens' let groups create anonymous cliques

    Secret has already worked its way into workplaces and schools with its addictive brand of anonymity, but now the iOS and Android app is getting a little more exclusive with new "dens" just for organizations.

  • Opinion: Tinder introduces Moments, because the world needs more disappearing messages

    Tinder wants to turn hookups into friends with a new disappearing message feature that seems a little similar to Snapchat.

  • Opinion: It's not all sunshine, as sharing start-ups tackle big issues at industry meet-up

    Bakers who sell home-made sweet potato pies from their homes and struggling city-dwellers who rent out their apartments on Airbnb don't typically have a lot in common--except in some states their money-making enterprises are considered illegal. Yet the "sharing economy" has become the defining buzz phrase that encompasses Airbnb hosts and food co-operatives, grassroots sharing efforts, and new iPhone apps. When you lump a bunch of people under one banner, that's bound to create some friction.

  • Opinion: How to mute annoying Twitter users, and why you'd want to

    Twitter is often a lovely place, where people share ideas and have interesting discussions about all kinds of topics. But like any public forum, Twitter has its fair share of annoying human beings clogging up your Timeline with inane--or even offensive--chatter. Twitter has now made it possible to easily mute those people. Bonus: They won't even know it happened.

  • Opinion: Lyft takes aim at Uber with premium Plus service

    When Lyft launched two years ago, it was a casual ride-sharing service where drivers used their own cars--nothing fancy, but nice enough--to give you a ride in the direction they were already heading. Because the rides looked like regular cars, drivers affixed hot pink mustaches to their bumpers. Lyft is now upping the ante with a higher-end Lyft Plus service offering luxury rides at higher prices.

  • Opinion: Tumblr takes a page from Myspace with on-the-go bedazzling

    Myspace briefly ruled the Internet with its unique brand of cacophony: garishly bright backgrounds, blinking graphics, auto-playing theme songs. Combined, those elements were a horrible mess, but they didn't detract from Myspace's popularity. Why? People love customization. Tumblr is proving it's this decade's Myspace with an iOS and Android app update that lets you personalize your site's colors, photos, and fonts. Sadly, there are no auto-playing soundtracks.

  • Opinion: Amazon teams with Twitter to turn hashtags into shopping shortcuts

    Whimsically purchasing nonsense you don't need from Amazon just isn't easy enough. One-click ordering, two-day shipping--or same-day delivery if you're lucky--are fine, I guess, but now Amazon is letting you add items to your shopping cart straight from Twitter. All it takes is a hashtag.

  • Opinion: You&Me is HowAboutWe's take on messaging for the modern couple'

    HowAboutWe is all about love: Making matches in the form of its main dating site and keeping the spark alive with its date-night concierge service for couples. Now the popular service is launching You&Me, a messaging app for iOS and Android designed to keep you close to your significant other.

  • Opinion: The Google+ reality check: How the social network can hang on without its creator

    For better or worse, Google's Vic Gundotra was entirely responsible for Google+, the company's struggling social network. When Gundotra announced Thursday that he is leaving the company, the G+ obituaries began pouring in. After all, how can Google+ make it without Gundotra's constant hype?

  • Opinion: Lesson learned: Facebook's new friend-finding feature is optional

    Facebook is giving the whole location-based friend-finding thing another shot. Almost two years after launching a Find Friends Nearby feature before quickly pulling it, the network is rolling out Nearby Friends. The difference? Way more control over privacy.

  • Opinion: Turns out most people prefer to watch TV instead of tweet about it

    Twitter and Facebook think they're pretty important to TV viewers and have spent the last year or so fighting for a piece of advertisers' budgets. But it turns out that most people aren't paying attention to social media at all when they tune in to their favorite shows.

  • Opinion: No more in-app chat: Facebook moving messages to Messenger

    Get ready for another major Facebook change. The company is stripping messages from its iOS and Android apps and directing users to install Facebook Messenger if they want to keep chatting with friends.

  • Opinion: As IDC Sees It, Tech's 'Third Platform' Disrupts Everyone

    What IDC deems the third platform of computing -- social, mobile, cloud and big data -- is transforming IT much faster than the first (mainframe) or second (client/server) platforms ever did. This has tremendous implications for the IT industry, yes, but also for anyone doing business in today's world.

  • Opinion: Twitter adds photo-sharing features as Instagram nips at the network's heels

    People love photos. Case in point: The popularity of Instagram, which has racked up 200 million active users in less than half of the time Twitter's been around. Twitter, in case you forgot, has only 241 million active users. So on Wednesday, Twitter forged its own spot in the photo-sharing field with a simultaneous update for iOS and Android now rolling out to users.

  • Opinion: TV on Twitter: Tweets get you to tune in and click through, study shows

    Twitter's TV push is working, new numbers show. Not only do tweets about TV shows get you to tune in and join the conversation, they can also get you to click on ads and buy products. That's news Twitter can--and will--use to its advantage.

  • Opinion: Twitter reportedly drops plan to encrypt direct messages

    End-to-end encryption is widely considered the best defense against a surveillance dragnet, but the tech companies that many of us interact with on a daily basis--Facebook, Google, Twitter--have been slow to offer protections for users. The Verge reported Wednesday that Twitter, which had reportedly planned to encrypt direct messages, has dropped the project to focus on more pressing matters.

  • Opinion: Tinder verifies celebs because famous people hook up, too

    Celebrities have really tough lives. They're hounded by photographers, take meaningless work just to scrape by, and have trouble meeting attractive people for casual flings.



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