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Latest Security Opinion

  • Opinion: Virtual servers still face real security threats

    Don't let the word "virtual" in virtual servers fool you. You're the only one who knows it's virtual. From the perspective of the virtual server itself, the devices connected to it, applications running on it, end-users connecting to it, or security threats trying to compromise it, the server is very, very real. A new survey from Kaspersky Labs found that many IT professionals understand that securing virtual environments is important, but don't fully understand the threats or how to properly defend against them.

  • Opinion: How free Wi-Fi could be stealing your data

    Free Wi-Fi spots are a very handy way to get online without using up your monthly 3G or 4G allowance, but are they genuine? Be careful of using unsecured hotspots, especially when conducting your private affairs. Here's how your data could be stolen and used against you.

  • Opinion: Are password managers secure?

    None of us can remember all our passwords. Yes, we know to use strong passwords, and we never use the same password on more than one site. It's troublesome, but it's part and parcel of our Internet privileges.

  • Opinion: Give Verizon your location data, get rewards in carrier's new program

    Verizon really wants your location data. And it's willing to give stuff away to get its 100-million-plus subscribers to hand that data over.

  • Opinion: Microsoft password research has fatal flaw

    I wrote yesterday about a report from Microsoft researchers, which goes against established password security best practices. The new guidance from the Microsoft researchers makes sense to me, because it fits how I handle password management already. However, at least one security expert feels that there is a fatal flaw that makes the new password advice impractical: You.

  • Opinion: Edward Snowden: Dropbox is 'hostile to privacy'

    Dropbox is a very popular cloud storage service, but NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden is no fan. In a recent interview with The Guardian, Snowden called Dropbox a "targeted, wannabe PRISM partner" that is "very hostile to privacy."

  • Opinion: The game isn't over yet for Gameover malware

    In early June the U.S. Department of Justice revealed that the Gameover Zeus (GOZ) botnet had been disabled thanks to the success of a joint effort dubbed "Operation Tovar." The celebration appears to have been premature, though, as security researchers have already discovered a resurgence of Gameover malware infections.

  • Opinion: ID cards and implants: convenient or a step too far?

    If you could have a chip implanted or carry around an ID card that meant you never again had to prove your ID, remember logins and passwords and so on, would you do it? That's the question we put to more than 4,000 visitors to PCAdvisor.co.uk, and the results might surprise you.

  • Opinion: Don't panic! Yes, Windows 7 is leaving mainstream support but it isn't being abandoned

    Earlier this week, Microsoft reminded the world that it will stop providing "mainstream support" for Windows 7 (and a slew of other products) in January of 2015. Immediately, the Web was flooded in a wave of confused or downright fearmongering headlines and articles implying that Windows 7 is following Windows XP into the graveyard.

  • Opinion: Some files need encryption and some files don't

    Andre De Beer asked if certain files on his hard drive need encryption. Some do and some don't.

  • Opinion: Blackshades: how Police cracked down on the hackers

    Blackshades is a nasty form of creepware that can take control of a computer remotely and give hackers a dangerous amount of access to your data. A worldwide law enforcement operation this month caught the creators of the software, and arrested many who were engaged in criminal use. We explore the story, and see what damage Blackshades wreaked.

  • Opinion: PopVote, CloudFlare trump DDoS attack

    Popular events on the Internet tend to jam channels solid. Rugby Sevens tickets, collectible dolls, what-have-you...when popularity spikes, cyberdemand overwhelms servers. Massive e-tailers like Amazon or Taobao, for example, use scalability at high levels when their traffic spikes during seasonal events.

  • Opinion: How to stop Facebook experimenting on you

    Facebook's in the firing line this week for running psychological experiments on 689,000 of its users back in 2012. Sounds scary, right? Well...

  • Opinion: How Google declared open war against passwords at I/O

    Google hasn't been shy in the past about its desire to kill the password, and at Google I/O, the company started throwing punches.

  • Opinion: Google's move into home automation means even less privacy

    Plans by smart thermostat maker Nest Labs to share some customer data with corporate parent Google means the search engine giant will be fending off privacy concerns as it expands into home automation.

  • Opinion: With Android L, Google makes pitch for enterprise users

    Google will provide enterprise-focused security and management features to its entire Android showcase of mobile devices, including features reserved only for Samsung devices running Samsung security software called Knox, a Google executive announced during the Google I/O keynote address Wednesday.

  • Opinion: Watch the web get hacked in real time on this mesmerizing map

    The constant barrage of headlines trumpeting high-profile security breaches makes it easy to understand at a high level that hack attacks are on the rise, but mere words alone don't truly convey the scope of the constant threats. A mesmerizing example of data visualization by computer security firm Norse lets you see penetration attempts in real time, via a DEFCON-esque map that feels like it was ripped right from the old WarGames movie.

  • Opinion: Study: 7 in 10 concerned about security of Internet-of-Things

    The Internet-of-Things is a thing. If you haven't heard about it yet, get ready because we're in the early stages of an explosion of technology that will connect, monitor, and in some cases share almost every aspect of our lives. Fortinet conducted a survey of consumers to find out what people think about the security and privacy concerns of the Internet-of-Things.

  • Opinion: Study: Concern over mobile device theft on the rise

    Have you ever had a smartphone or tablet stolen? The devices' size and portability makes them prime targets for criminals, and there is a rising trend of people being mugged for their mobile devices. A new study found that consumers are increasingly concerned with the risk of having a mobile device stolen.

  • Opinion: Defend yourself against World Cup scams

    The 2014 World Cup tournament kicks off today in Brazil. Soccer (or football anywhere outside of the United States) is the most popular sport in the world, and billions of people will be following the matches closely. While you're busy figuring out how to stream games to your work PC while appearing to be busy with an Excel spreadsheet, you should be aware that World Cup will also be a feeding frenzy of malware and phishing attacks.

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