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More Photo & Video Opinion

  • Opinion: How to time-stamp your video in iMovie

    I hope we can all agree that it’s good that video cameras no longer burn the date and time into footage as they used to. If you missed this particular piece of video history, cameras had an option to include the date and time on every frame of video. (Many cameras can still do this.)

  • Opinion: Six Good Reasons to Try GIMP 2.8

    Of all the many examples of excellent free and open source software out there, GIMP is surely among the best known examples for offering a no-cost and yet power-packed alternative to an extremely high-priced proprietary market leader.

  • Opinion: Ask the iTunes Guy: More iTunes Match questions

    [Ask the iTunes Guy is a regular column in which we answer your questions on everything iTunes related. If there’s something you’d like to know, send an email to the iTunes Guy for consideration.]

  • Opinion: RGBD Toolkit Combines Kinects and DSLRs, Makes a Match Made in Film Geek Heaven

    Previously on GeekTech, we featured a Virtual Cinematography project that overlaid Kinect depth-sensing maps with HD video from a DLSR. It was an incredible feat for quick-made 3D models that only a crack team of professional videographers and programmers could pull off.

  • Opinion: Free Fotobounce Helps You Organize and Share Photos

    If your photos are centered around the people in your life, it makes sense that your photo organization tool should be, too. That's the thinking behind Fotobounce, a free application that helps you organize and securely share your snapshots.

  • Opinion: On What Media Should I Backup My Photos?

    Nick Golna asked whether he should backup his photos onto a flash drive or DVDs. I discuss other options, as well.

  • Opinion: Choosing the Right Shutter Speed

    One of the most intriguing aspects of photography is that it's both an art and a science. Science tells us that, for most photos, there's a specific amount of light that will generate the "perfect" exposure--sort of like measuring chemicals in a laboratory. But it's not all test tubes and Bunsen burners in photography, because there are a million ways to get the right amount of light into your scene. Lots of different shutter speeds and aperture settings add up to the right exposure, for example. You're already had a chance to experiment with that using an interactive online camera simulator. And therein lies the art: No two photographers will ever capture the same scene in exactly the same way. This week, let's zero in on shutter speed and talk about how you can get a variety of different photo effects and visual styles just by varying this one camera control.

  • Opinion: Bugs & Fixes: From Mail crashes to HTML5 video failures

    It's bargain day at Bugs & Fixes. This week's column offers three separate items for the price of one.

  • Opinion: The Best Free Stuff of 2012 (Alphabetical List)

    For more information about all of the items in our 2012 Best Free Stuff list, read our package of articles.

  • Opinion: Taking Photos of Firefighters, Moving the Flash Off-Camera, Resizing vs. Cropping

    Have a question about digital photography? Send it to me. I reply to as many as I can--though given the quantity of e-mails that I get, I can't promise a personal reply to each one. I round up the most interesting questions about once a month here in Digital Focus.

  • Opinion: Magnifi Lets You Snap Pictures from Your Telescope and Microscope

    We’ve previously covered some iPhone attachments that let you dock the camera to a microscope’s eyepiece to take microscopic pictures. But Arcturus Labs wants to take this a step further: It's working on a new iPhone case/attachment, called the Magnifi, that lets you take pictures as seen through your microscope, telescope, binoculars, or any optic with an eyepiece.

  • Opinion: Ask the iTunes Guy: iTunes tips and tricks

    [Ask the iTunes Guy is a regular column in which we answer your questions on everything iTunes related. If there’s something you’d like to know, send an email to the iTunes Guy for consideration.]

  • Opinion: Tupac's Coachella 'Hologram' Performance Explained

    Rapper Tupac Shakur was murdered in Las Vegas back in 1996, but this past weekend, the acclaimed artist took to the stage once again, only this time in hologram form. In a surprise gig, the Thug Life rapper "performed" several of his greatest hits at the Coachella festival in Indio, California, before being joined on stage by Snoop Dogg.

  • Opinion: Wal-Mart Launches Vudu Disc-to-Digital Store Program: Here's How It Works

    Want to turn your bulging library of digital video discs into high-definition video streams that you can access anytime without spending a fortune?

  • Opinion: Make a Radiant Portrait

    No doubt you have heard someone be complimented with the effusive expression, "You are positively radiant!" I love the sentiment, but I've never quite seen it in real life. Who has skin that actually glows? Perhaps I'm being too literal. Nonetheless, regardless what you think of this in real life, you can create a radiant glow in your digital portraits through some clever photo editing trickery. Using a technique similar to the Orton Effect--which works very nicely in still life and landscape photographs--you can add a warm and romantic glow to your portraits. Here's how.

  • Opinion: How to capture video from an iOS device

    Reader Andrew Lane is interested in the technique I used to capture video from my iPad's screen. He writes:

  • Opinion: Instagram, Facebook Deal Sparks Privacy and Quality Concerns: Here's How to Quit

    It's been a rough week for Instagram purists.

  • Opinion: Using Creative Commons to Find Photos You Can Use

    Photos and the Internet go together like peanut butter and jelly. For as long as there have been web browsers, people have generously posted photos online--which other people have then downloaded and used for their own purposes, whether or not they've actually asked for permission. To make it easier to legally and ethically reuse photos posted online, the Creative Commons license was created. I first mentioned Creative Commons in "Your Photos, Your Rights, and the Law." This week let's learn a little more about Creative Commons--both how you can use it to share your own photos and how to use other peoples' works.

  • Opinion: Google Glasses All Hype or Reality?

    Google fans hope the Internet search leader's proposed augmented reality glasses are more reality than hype, even if history shows companies are more often releasing videos touting technology that may take years to actually come to life.

  • Opinion: Photo Files 101: All About Megapixels, Megabytes, and DPI

    To take good photos, you don't really need to know a lot of technical details about digital photo files any more than you need know how a car engine works to drive to work every day. But sometimes it can help, especially when it comes to sharing and publishing your photos. Take the seemingly simple concept of resolution. Do you know what size a photo should be in order to turn your photo into a high-quality 8-by-10-inch print? What if you want to email it? What do megapixels and megabytes have to do with one another?



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