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More Peripherals Opinion

  • Opinion: How to reset the Wi-Fi password at your parents' house on your holiday travels

    Going visiting this holiday season? If you're staying with friends or family members, don't be surprised if the bed is lumpy, the room is cold, and the Wi-Fi is locked down.

  • Opinion: Big screens are so 2012: Samsung is planning a phone with a three-sided display

    Samsung basically invented the super-sized phone with its Galaxy S series of elite handsets. But now that the five-inchish display has become old hat, the Korean manufacturer has begun to experiment with wholly new display form factors.

  • Opinion: 'Disarming Corruptor' disguises 3D printing designs to fight The Man

    3D printing promises a glorious future, one where you'll be able to create and manufacture nearly anything you can think of right from the comfort of your own home. But the future potential of 3D printing isn't limited by your imagination alone: The law is tossing up barriers for the nascent technology.

  • Opinion: How to effectively fill your Mac's display when screen sharing

    Reader Earl Andrews is interested in getting the full picture--at least when screen sharing with his Mac mini. He writes:

  • Opinion: Mac Gems: Look ma, no mouse--thanks to Keymo

    Editor's note: The following review is part of Macworld's GemFest 2013. Every day (except Sunday) from mid-July until late September, the Macworld staff will use the Mac Gems blog to briefly cover a standout free or low-cost program. Learn more about GemFest in this Macworld podcast. You can view a list of this year's apps, updated daily, on our handy GemFest page, and you can visit the Mac Gems homepage for past Mac Gems reviews.

  • Opinion: Microsoft launches revamped, right-handed Sculpt Mouse on International Left-Handers Day

    Most ergonomic tech gear tends towards the practical. But Microsoft's new Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard and Mouse may actually inspire some envy from design nuts as well.

  • Opinion: MakerBot 3D printers expand to more Microsoft Stores

    When Windows 8.1 rolls out to PCs everywhere this fall, it will come with 3D printer support that is supposed to make creating a plastic figurine as easy as printing off your monthly expense report in Excel. Not wanting to miss a golden opportunity to show off the capabilities of 3D printing and Windows in the same place, MakerBot 3D printers are debuting now in 18 Microsoft Store retail locations across the U.S.

  • Opinion: 3D printing is coming to a UPS Store near you

    Apparently, Brown can do more for you than just ship your packages. UPS retail stores, starting with one in San Diego and coming to more locations around the US in the future, will begin offering 3D printing services using a StratasysuPrint SE Plus printer.

  • Opinion: Study finds major savings through household 3D printing

    Originally published by Txchnologist.

  • Opinion: Secrets of the paperless office: optimizing OCR

    Since I started using a document scanner about seven years ago, I've scanned many thousands of pages and used OCR (optical character recognition) software to convert those scans into searchable PDFs. I've also written extensively about the paperless office. But when you try to reduce the amount of paper you use, you inevitably increase the amount of hard-drive space you use. I began to wonder what combinations of scanner settings and software would get the best quality scan results while using the least hard-disk space.

  • Opinion: The Mac office: Embracing the nearly paperless future

    I have a nice document scanner. I have great OCR and document-management software. I have a solid system for converting paper into digital documents. I hardly ever print anything. I even wrote a book on the paperless office. And yet, somehow, I still have tons of papers in my home office, and despite my best efforts, more appear all the time. What's happening?

  • Opinion: How to rip a DVD with HandBrake

    [Editor's note: The MPAA and most media companies argue that you can't legally copy or convert commercial DVDs for any reason. We (and others) think that, if you own a DVD, you should be able to override its copy protection to make a backup copy or to convert its content for viewing on other devices. Currently, the law isn't entirely clear one way or the other. So our advice is: If you don't own it, don't do it. If you do own it, think before you rip.]

  • Opinion: Is it me, or are the walls melting in this 3D printed room?

    We've seen some pretty weird 3D-printed stuff, including Stephen Colbert's tentacle laden head, but a 3D-printed room with walls that look like they're melting takes the cake. Designed by Benjamin Dillenburger and Michael Hansmeyer, the Digital Grotesque project is an amazing, gothic, yet organic architecture project that aims to create the world's first completely 3D-printed room.

  • Opinion: Ripped DVDs and the empty AUDIO_TS folder

    A reader who wishes to remain anonymous is curious about the structure of DVDs. He or she writes:

  • Opinion: Windows 8 touch-compatible accessories

    It might not seem obvious but a touch-compatible mouse will really help you make the most of Windows 8.

  • Opinion: 3D printing could lead to bionic brain chips, microscopic toy bunnies

    The idea of applying a regular computer chip directly to your brain is silly, so scientists at Japan's Yokohama National University have created a new material that can be shaped into complex, conductive microscopic 3D structures. What does that mean? It could potentially lead to custom brain electrodes.

  • Opinion: BotObjects announces the world's first full-color 3D printer

    It's finally here. A new 3D printing outfit in New York called BotObjects say that it's come up with the first full-color desktop 3D printer. Unlike other consumer-grade 3D printers, the ProDesk3D does not print in just one or two different colored plastic mediums; instead, it prints using the whole gamut of the rainbow by mixing five base colors together.

  • Opinion: CRT magnet art looks eerie; don't try it on your home TV

    Where you one of those kids who liked to wave a magnet against your old CRT display to watch the rainbow of colors bending to your will? You certainly weren't the only one, and a German artist wants to help you relive those memories, albeit on a grander scale.

  • Opinion: 3D printing comes to phones and games at MakerBot's first hackathon

    3D printers have gotten to the point that they can print just about anything you can imagine (yes, even food). But while we've been focusing on better machines and more insane prints, you may have forgotten about the most important step that magically turns a digital file into a physical object--the software.

  • Opinion: Trax is a wearable GPS for your pets and little ones

    When your smaller mammalian responsibilities wander, it may be wise to keep tabs on them. Wonder Technology Solutions (aka WTS) has come with a suitably diminutive, well, solution. The Trax (funding through April 12) should allow you to keep an intelligent digital leash on your children or pets.



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