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Powder Power! Pwdr Is an Open-Source 3D Powder Printer That You Can Build

Why powder your nose when you can powder your way to a whole universe of possibilities?

3D printing is slowly becoming the next big thing. Over the last few weeks, we've heard of people making everything from blood vessels to kid-sized exoskeletons--the possibilities seem almost endless. But what if you're too broke to buy yourself a 3D printer and too cool make yet another RepRep 3D printer? The answer is simple: cement your individuality and build yourself a Pwdr instead.

What's a Pwdr? It's an "open source, powder-based rapid prototyping machine" that works very much like the powder printers you see in factories, it seems. According to its GitHub page, you can build a Pwdr with off-the-shelf components, and it will only set you back approximately 963 Euros (around $1184 as of this writing).

The current model can make use of materials like gypsum, ceramics, concrete, and sugar, to name a few. However, once the SLS process becomes fully supported, you will be able to construct things out of materials such as ABS, PP, Nylon and a variety of metals.

If you're interested in getting a start on this new printer, check out the files on the Pwdr page on GitHub.

Cassandra Khaw is an entry-level audiophile, a street dancer, a person who writes about video games for a living, and someone who spends too much time on Twitter.

[Pwdr via Hack a Day]

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