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Stolen mobile phones to be blocked

Many road signs, if you look closely at the back of them, will tell you that the metal they are made of has no scrap value. This means people don't steal them. So why not apply this principle to other things?

Like mobile phones, for example. Well, that's exactly what the government plans to do, with the help of the mobile operators.

Not long after mobile phones and iPods were blamed for a surge in street robberies, Home Secretary John Reid has pledged £1.35m to the National Mobile Phone Unit, a specialist group set up to deal with the problem of mobile phone theft.

This begs the question: why was this not done some time ago? It surely can't be that difficult. Other things such as MP3 players and watches are near enough impossible to devalue or disable once they've been stolen. Relatively small amounts of money can't be traced after they've been taken from their rightful owner. But mobile phones have to contact network operators in order to serve their purpose. So if they can do that, surely tracing them would be absolutely no problem at all, regardless of what SIM card is inside them.

If you would like to help the police in their fight against mobile phone theft and other types of crime then follow this link.

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