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iPod ate my hamster

Well, not quite. But according to daily free-sheet the Metro, the ubiquitous MP3 player is responsible for a crime wave.

So should we be afraid of Apple's audio gadget? Beyond fearing rampant conformity, no. Apparently iPods inspire the crooked to commit crookery. And it's not constant access to things called 'grime', '2-step' and [insert name of music here that makes it look like I'm up with the kids] that's driving the hoodie-wearing yoof to steal. (Incidentally, it's still safe to listen to ELO, too.)

Further investigative journalism – okay, a quick browse of BBC news online – reveals that the real story is new figures that show a rise in street crime. Home secretary John Reid has attributed this unfortunate turn of events to the proliferation of desirable gadgets – including MP3 players and mobile phones – that people travel with.

On the face of it this seems reasonable. And there's no reason to doubt that it is the cause behind the effect. But I do resent the implication that carrying nice kit makes you a target for crime.

Extrapolate this theory far enough and the victim becomes as responsible as the perp. I carry an iPod and a mobile phone, and I'm quite prepared to keep them under wraps when I'm down dark alleys. But if I get mugged tonight whilst I'm changing tracks, it won't be my fault. And the mugger will face a crash course in 1990s indie. Poor lamb.

More here.

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