We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
78,721 News Articles

CES: Windows 7 tablet runs Intel's Oak Trail

Motion Computing shows business-focused tablet

Motion Computing has unveiled at CES a business-focused Windows 7 tablet PC that's highly power efficient and has strong multimedia capabilities.

The Motion CL900 is a 10.1in tablet based on the upcoming Oak Trail version of Intel’s Atom chip. Motion says the 1.5GHz processor helps the tablet run multiple enterprise applications simultaneously, as well as deliver HD video and graphics, without compromising battery life.

The CL900, which supports 1080p high-definition video at 30 frames per second, runs for up to eight hours, according to a Motion Computing representative at CES.

Motion CL900

The longer battery life was made possible by changes Intel has made at the chip level with Oak Trail, according to Motion. The chip has specialised hardware to quickly decode high-definition video, as well as decoders to accelerate the playback of MPEG files in Windows Media Player.

The 1kg tablet is designed for testing business environments, and can withstand drops from 48 inches, Motion said. It includes 30GB of solid-state drive storage and 2GB of RAM.

GPS, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity are built in, while communications are aided via standard front and rear-facing cameras.

Motion said the CL900 will cost around $1,000 in the US, where it will ship in Q2. UK prices and availability have yet to be announced.

See also:

CES news

CES videos


IDG UK Sites

LG G Watch review: Android Wear smartwatch is the best around, so far

IDG UK Sites

How to join Apple's OS X Beta Seed Program: Get OS X Yosemite on your Mac before public release

IDG UK Sites

Why the BBC iPlayer outage was caused by a DDoS attack: Topsy and Tim isn't *that* popular

IDG UK Sites

See Glasgow 2014 in UHD as history is made