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5 open source virtualisation technologies to watch in 2011

Consolidate infrastructure without shrinking the savings

As well as proprietary virtualisation software from the likes of Microsoft and IBM, there is a vibrant open source virtualisation ecosystem that CIOs can consider for public and private cloud infrastructure. We've taken a look a virtualisation software that can consolidate infrastructure without shrinking the savings.

With virtualisation now a mainstream technology for most large businesses, the big players like EMC (VMWare), IBM and Microsoft are investing heavily in proprietary options for running multiple guest operating systems on a single machine.

In addition to the commercial products, there is a vibrant open source virtualisation ecosystem that CIOs can consider for public and private cloud infrastructure.

We've taken a look a virtualisation software that can consolidate infrastructure without shrinking the savings.

KVM

Short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine, KVM is not as widely deployed as other open source hypervisors, but its stature is growing rapidly. KVM is a full virtualisation hypervisor and can run both Windows and Linux guests.

With the kernel component of KVM included in Linux since kernel 2.6.20, KVM can claim a good level of integration with the rest of the operating system.

KVM received its biggest validation in late 2008 when Linux vendor Red Hat acquired KVM developer Qumranet. Red Hat now bases its enterprise virtualisation server on the KVM hypervisor.
Licence: GPL

Xen

Xen began life as a Microsoft-funded startup at the University of Cambridge www.cam.ac.uk and has risen to become the 'de facto standard' in Linux hypervisors.

Xen supports paravirtualisation and "hardware assisted" virtualisation for modified and un-modified guests, respectively.

Guests can be Linux or Windows, but the overwhelming majority of guests are Linux variants, particularly in the hosting space.

A few years ago quite a few commercial software vendors, including Novell and Oracle, adopted Xen and then - seemingly out of nowhere - the commercial startup behind Xen, XenSource, was acquired by Citrix. Citrix has been Xen-happy ever since.

Recently, CIO reported on the private cloud development at the ACMA in Canberra, which is based on Citrix's Xen hypervisor.
Licence: GPL

OpenVZ

OpenVZ is container-based virtualisation for Linux which has become quite popular among the mass-market Linux hosting providers as an inexpensive way to provide virtual private servers.

The OpenVZ containers provide the same services as a separate host, and claims to provide near native performance.

OpenVZ is the core within Parallels Virtuozzo Containers, a commercial virtualization solution offered by Swiss company Parallels. Commercial support is available for Parallels.

Not a lot has been written about OpenVZ/Parallels in the enterprise space, but there are quite a few glowing user testimonials about the product.
Licence: GPL

NEXT PAGE: VirtualBox

  1. Open-source alternatives
  2. VirtualBox


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