We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
80,259 News Articles

Firefox gets a new chief executive

All change at the top for Mozilla

John Lilly, Mozilla's chief operating officer, has replaced Mitchell Baker as the CEO of Mozilla Corporation. Baker helped make the Firefox web browser a potent rival to Microsoft's Internet Explorer.

Lilly becomes responsible for pushing out the updates to Firefox and Mozilla's Thunderbird email software, the company announced yesterday. Baker will retain her role as chairman and stay active within the group, she said.

Baker has been with Mozilla since its inception. She was an attorney with Netscape Communications in the late 1990s when it created the Mozilla Organisation, and she stayed with the group after AOL bought Netscape and helped to create the Mozilla Foundation in 2003.

Since then the open-source browser has built a worldwide market share of about 15 percent, according to estimates, and as high as 30 percent in some European markets. Mozilla says it now has 125 million Firefox users worldwide.

In a blog posting on Monday, Baker said she'd been thinking for some time about the best way to use her time and about which of her duties could be handled equally well by someone else.

Those duties, it turns out, are the day to day management of Mozilla's software, while Baker sees a wider role for herself in improving the web experience for end users.

For the latest news on the internet, visit Broadband Advisor.

"I have a vision of the internet and online life and a positive user experience - and of Mozilla's role in creating these - that is far broader than browsers, email clients and even technology in general," she wrote.

She said she'll focus on efforts to make the web standards process more effective, make security "understandable enough that people can protect themselves", and encourage more "hybrid" organisations like Mozilla - "organisations which serve the public benefit but support themselves through revenue rather than fund-raising."

"I want Mozilla's influence on the industry to go beyond the bits we ship as software. More particularly, I want to use the impact Firefox gives us in the market to get openness, collaboration and user control embedded in other products, services and aspects of online life," she wrote.

Lilly, her replacement, will be focused on getting the next version of Mozilla's web browser, Firefox 3.0, out of the door. Read a review of Firefox 3.0 beta 2 here.

Lilly also wants to be more open about how Mozilla operates and how it will support itself in the future. "I’d like us to start talking more in public about how the future looks for Mozilla," he wrote on his blog.

Baker remains chairman of both the Mozilla Foundation, the non-profit side of the project, and the Mozilla Corporation, which was formed a few years ago to help raise funds and manage product releases.

"I've been involved in shipping Mozilla products since the dawn of time, and have no intention of distancing myself from our products or Mozilla Corporation," Baker wrote.


IDG UK Sites

iPhone 6 review: best ever iPhone is very good... but no longer the best phone you can buy

IDG UK Sites

Why Apple and Samsung, Google and Microsoft's schoolyard spats make them all look stupid

IDG UK Sites

How to successfully bridge the gap between clients and creatives

IDG UK Sites

How to update your iPhone or iPad to iOS 8: including how to install iOS 8 if you don't have room ()......