We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
80,259 News Articles

First Windows 7 benchmarks

Test Center benchmarks: Windows 7 unmasked

| 13 November 08

The view from inside: a minor tweak to Vista

I began my exploration of Windows 7 by poking around the OS's innards. Using a combination of the Windows Performance Monitor utility and some reference data I'd gathered from Windows Vista and XP, I began comparing the runtime structure and composition of various OS processes and services.

First up was the Windows 7 kernel - a.k.a. the System process. When comparing Windows versions, it's always good to start with the kernel because this is where the most fundamental changes take place. For example, when Microsoft went from Windows 2000 to Windows XP, the System process gained 21 execution threads in its default configuration. Likewise, when Microsoft introduced Windows Vista, the kernel gained 39 execution threads.

In fact, the kernel in each major new version of the Windows OS has spawned a different, typically higher number of threads. So when I examined Windows 7 and found a nearly identical thread count (97 to 100) for the System process, I knew right away that I was dealing with a minor point-type of release, as opposed to a major update or rewrite. This was not 'MinWin,' the mythical, streamlined new Windows kernel that promised a clean break with the bloated Vista.

windows 7

Next up: the memory footprint for the kernel. Like the System process, memory footprint tends to vary widely from version to version, with successive releases showing an ever-expanding kernel working set. Based on the thread count values I observed in my previous example, I anticipated that the working set would be similar to Vista's. And in keeping with my initial suspicions, Windows 7 M3's System process indeed consumed a similar amount of memory (3.5MB to 4.5MB). So far, the new OS was looking a lot like Vista.

In fact, as I worked my way through the process lists of the two operating systems, I was struck by the extent of the similarities. Key subsystems, including the Desktop Window Manager (dwm) and Client/Server Runtime (csrss), sported similar thread counts and working set sizes. When viewed side by side in Performance Monitor, Vista and Windows 7 were virtually indistinguishable.

Two of Microsoft's selling points for Windows 7 have been improved performance and lower resource requirements when compared to Vista. However, these sorts of gains traditionally have been difficult to realise without significantly modifying the OS at a kernel level, and the telltale signs were showing that the changes were minor. What would happen if I threw some test workloads at this OS?

Page 2: The view from inside: a minor tweak to Vista

Page 3: First Windows 7 benchmarks

Page 4: Vista similarities and potentail pitfalls

Page 5: Windows 7 bottom line


IDG UK Sites

Very best Black Friday 2014 tech deals UK: Latest bargains on phones, tablets, laptops and more...

IDG UK Sites

Black Friday feeding frenzy infects the UK

IDG UK Sites

VAT MOSS: Will I be affected by the EU VAT changes? Here are the facts for designers and artists

IDG UK Sites

Black Friday 2014 UK: Apple deals, Amazon deals & Black Friday tech offers