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78,639 News Articles

More Security News

  • News: Free Downloads That Are Worth a Donation, Part 1

    During my day-to-day work I turn to certain applications time and again, and soon they become indispensable, seeming to blend in with Windows itself. Some of those programs are full-blown commercial products, such as Microsoft Office or Total Commander. Others, however, are applications I did not have to pay a dime for, thanks to the generosity of hardworking developers who have opted to share their creations with the world for free, requesting only a donation from those users who are willing and able. (PCWorld's Downloads library lists donationware as free, but you'll see a telltale editor's note on the review page explaining that the program's developers accept contributions.)

  • News: Two zero-day vulnerabilities found in Flash Player

    Two newly discovered vulnerabilities in Adobe's Flash Player can be exploited to execute arbitrary code remotely, according to advisories from the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) and various security research companies.

  • News: UK police arrest six in student loan phishing scam

    U.K. police arrested six people on Thursday for allegedly running a phishing scam that stole an estimated £1.6 million (US$2.6 million) from victims who had taken out student loans.

  • News: 22% of Brits never stray far from net-connected devices

    More than one if five (22 percent) of Brits claim they never stray more than 10 feet away from an internet-connected device, says Mozy.

  • News: Government applications still riddled with serious security flaws

    The US government sector is markedly worse than private industry at eliminating a range of common but serious flaws from software code, an analysis of real applications submitted for review to testing company Veracode has found.

  • News: Brits have £34,350 worth of data on digital devices

    The average Brit has £34,350 worth of data stored on their digital devices, says McAfee.

  • News: Lost USB keys an easy target for criminals wanting personal data

    Tax deductions, photo albums and Web source codes were just some of the kinds of personal information Sophos found on 50 USB keys purchased in a RailCorp lost property auction in Sydney.

  • News: Google, Microsoft teams work to keep pace with privacy laws

    Executives from Microsoft and Google on Thursday gave a glimpse into the size of their privacy organizations, which are required for the companies to try to avoid running foul of complicated U.S. privacy regulations and prepare for changes coming to privacy laws around the globe.

  • News: Senators, critics question ICANN's generic TLD plan

    The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) may be moving forward too fast on a plan to sell hundreds of new generic top-level domains starting early next year, several U.S. senators said Thursday.

  • News: Google's Schmidt calls Carrier IQ software a keylogger

    Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt today distanced his company from Carrier IQ's software, even as he described the technology as a keylogger. Schmidt's comments came at an Internet freedom conference in the Netherlands.

  • News: Microsoft plans 20 patches next week, likely to fix Duqu and BEAST bugs

    Microsoft today announced it will issue 14 security bulletins next week to patch 20 vulnerabilities in Windows, Internet Explorer (IE), Office, and Windows Media Player.

  • News: Virginia Tech on lockdown after 2 fatal shootings

    Virginia Tech, the Blacksburg, Va., school that was rocked in 2007 by the deadliest shooting rampage by a single gunman in U.S. history, has been locked down this afternoon in the wake of shootings that have resulted in at least two deaths.

  • News: Feds launch cloud security standards program

    Federal agencies will soon have a government-wide security standard for assessing, authorizing and monitoring cloud products and services.

  • News: Four charged with hacking point-of-sale computers

    Four residents of Romania have been charged for their alleged participation in a multimillion-dollar scheme to remotely access point-of-sale systems at more than 150 Subway restaurants and other U.S. merchants and steal payment card data, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

  • News: New system secures cellphones for Web transactions

    The story, "New system secures cellphones for Web transactions," posted to the wire Tuesday, incorrectly identified Srikar Sagi in the second paragraph. Sagi is the author of PAL and a security researcher. The second paragraph has been changed and now reads:

  • News: Facebook may be scary, but we love it anyway

    As a research scientist for Barracuda networks, Daniel Peck has spent much of his time in the last year looking at activity on social networks and analyzing the common tactics used to scam, phish and otherwise trick people into clicking on bad links. A break down of the malicious activity on social networks can be found in By the numbers: How dangerous are Facebook, Twitter, search results (really)?

  • News: By the numbers: How dangerous are Facebook, Twitter, and search engines (really)?

    In his presentation titled "The dark side: Measuring and analyzing malicious activity on Twitter and Facebook," Daniel Peck, research scientist with Barracuda Networks, delves into the details of how cybercriminals trap people on social networks. Peck's research also uncovered that user perceptions of social networking security contrasts drastically with actual membership rates, which you can read about in Facebook may be scary, but we love it anyway.

  • News: Dutch SSL certificate provider Gemnet investigates website compromise

    Gemnet, a Dutch company that provides SSL certificates for the Dutch government, has closed down its website after it was compromised by a hacker who found sensitive information on the server hosting it.

  • News: Second-hand USB drives riddled with malware, Sophos finds

    Two thirds of a random assortment of USB flash drives bought second-hand at an Australian rail company lost property auction turned out to be infected with malware, security company Sophos has reported.

  • News: Facebook Flaw Exposes Myth of Online Privacy

    Facebook is making headlines this week for a flaw that exposed personal photos marked private--including pictures of Mark Zuckerberg and his dog. The glitch is Facebook’s fault, and Facebook responded quickly to address the issue once it was discovered. But, don’t believe for a second that this is the last time private information will be exposed online--on Facebook, or anywhere else.



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