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Hacker McKinnon's extradition is 'inevitable'

Former prosecutor opens up on high-profile case

The former prosecutor in the Gary McKinnon hacking case said there's no reason to believe the European Court of Human Rights will ultimately block the alleged hacker's extradition to the United States.

On Tuesday, the France-based court held up the British hacker's extradition and called for an August 28 meeting to decide whether the court should continue to block the extradition.

McKinnon, 42, of London, is charged in the US with eight counts of unauthorised access and causing damage to a protected computer. He was indicted in 2002 for allegedly breaking into military computers and other government systems 2001 and 2002. He has been fighting extradition since then, and so far has been able to stay out of the US and its courts.

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The European Court of Human Rights delayed the extradition just a week after the highest British court dismissed what had been McKinnon's latest appeal against extradition. At the time his lawyer, Karen Todner, said his last hope was an appeal to the European Court of Human Rights.

"I was slightly surprised, I must say," said Scott Christie, who was an assistant US attorney in New Jersey at the start of the hacking investigation, and was the first prosecutor brought into the case.

"The European Union has this body which addresses perceived violations of the European human rights convention. Mr McKinnon believes his rights under that convention have been violated by the UK rulings."

McKinnon has contended that if extradited to the US, he could be treated as a terrorist, tried in a military tribunal and ultimately imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay.

"Mr McKinnon has never been classified in that manner or treated in that manner, as far as I'm aware," said Christie, who now leads the information technology group at law firm McCarter & English LLP. "He will be treated as a normal criminal defendant in the civil court system of this country. He's a run-of-the-mill criminal with a run-of-the-mill crime."

Christie said McKinnon simply is "grasping at straws" with his latest appeal.

He also noted that since McKinnon has become something of a "cause celebre", the European court is going to take its time and give the issue a full and fair review. But that doesn't mean the court will uphold the stay on his extradition.

"At this point and time, there's no indication the European court will give any credibility to his argument," said Christie. "It would be premature for him to believe that he has found a sympathetic shoulder to cry on. For all the reasons he didn't prevail in the UK, he shouldn't prevail there. Enough already, Mr McKinnon."


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