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Panasonic digital SLR to hit Japan in July

No word on European launch date yet

Panasonic today announced that its first digital SLR (single lens reflex) camera will go on sale in Japan next month, with other regions to follow soon after.

The DMC-L1 is the result of a year-long joint-development program with Olympus and is one of several DSLR cameras due to hit this market this year.

Single-lens reflex cameras use a mirror placed between the lens and the film or image sensor to project the image to the camera's viewfinder. The mirror moves out of the way when the picture is taken. They typically support interchangeable lenses and are preferred by professional and serious amateur photographers over the compact point-and-shoot models that dominate the digital-camera market.

The DMC-L1 camera is based around a new image sensor developed by Panasonic and Olympus. The Live MOS sensor is capable of sending a live image so that the user can frame the picture on the camera's LCD monitor. Typically DSLRs require the use of an optical viewfinder for framing and image composition. This is in common with analogue film cameras and preferred by professionals, but not as easy to use for many amateur photographers.

The camera first appeared at the Photo Marketing Association's 2006 trade fair in February, so the main specifications are already known.

The sensor will be able to capture 7.5Mp (megapixel) image resolution pictures and the rear display is a 2.5in LCD screen. There's also a dust reduction system that uses supersonic vibration to shake dust off the image sensor. In DSLR cameras dust can get inside the camera when the lens is changed and that can affect image quality.

The "Four Thirds System" lens mount is used on the camera. The mount, which is the socket into which lenses plug, represents at attempt by Olympus, Panasonic, Kodak, FujiFilm, Sanyo and Sigma to create a standard image sensor and lens mount.

Camera makers each typically use a proprietary lens mount common through all their models. This means that photographers don't have to go through the expense of replacing a lens when they upgrade a camera. But it does, in effect, lock a photographer into cameras from a specific manufacturer as replacing a number of lenses is often an expensive proposition.

Fierce competition in the point-and-shoot compact camera market has pushed Panasonic and others to develop DSLRs, which are typically more expensive and have higher profit margins. But the launch of several DSLRs is expected to increase competition and push down DSLR prices making the cameras slightly less lucrative.

The planned 22 July launch of the DMC-L1 in Japan will immediately serve to put pressure on Sony, which is planning to launch its first DSLR camera a day earlier on 21 July.

The DMC-L1 will ship in the US a little later, in September, priced at $1,999 (about £1,100). Plans for Europe and elsewhere weren't immediately available.


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