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Fuji announces two new hobbyist cameras

Fujifilm North America has released a pair of fixed-lens Wi-Fi-enabled cameras for consumers and sports enthusiasts.

Fujifilm North America has released a pair of fixed lens Wi-Fi-enabled cameras--one is a DSLR-like long-zoom and the other is a rugged model for outdoor shooting. The new FinePix S8400W compact point and shoot features a 44x optical long zoom and updated CMOS sensor. The FinePix XP200, the latest addition to the company's rugged XP Series, features a reinforced 5x lens, and is waterproof, shockproof, freezeproof, and dustproof. 

These two cameras are part of the trend toward consumer-oriented specialized shooting. With the FinePix S8400W, its superzoom gives a telephoto advantage to a consumer level point and shoot. The burgeoning popularity of sports-oriented rugged cameras allows the FinePix XP200 to offer action enthusiasts more choices for shooting underwater, in icy or sandy environments, and in situations where a camera may have to survive some impact.

S8400W long zoom

The compact Fujifilm FinePix S8400W combines a long zoom with fast autofocus speeds and Wi-Fi sharing and is targeted to photo enthusiasts. This new model features a 44x optical long zoom (24-1056mm) lens with an aperture of f/2.9 to f/6.5, paired with an optical image stabilization system. A super macro mode lets users get as close as 0.39 inches from a subject for close-ups, the company says.

This lens consists of 17 elements in 12 groups, and combines aspherical and ED (extra low dispersion) elements that reduce aberrations and promote image quality.

The 4.84 by 3.43 by 4.57-inch camera has a 1/2.3-inch 16-megapixel BSI-CMOS sensor with an ISO range of 64 to 12800. It weighs 1.48 pounds. The camera provides an autofocus speed of 0.3 seconds, start-up time of 1 second, a 0.5- second interval between shots, and a continuous shooting speed of up to 10 frames per second (maximum 10 frames at full resolution) for fast-action shots. The camera is also capable of ultra-high-speed shooting at up to 60fps (maximum 60 frames with an image size 1280 by 960 pixels) and up to 120fps (maximum 60 frames at an image size of 640 by 480). Plus, the S8400W lets users capture action in slow-motion and includes a range of artistic shooting effects. The camera can detect scene types and automatically selects the appropriate camera settings, such as Portrait, Landscape, Night, Macro, Night Portrait, and Backlit Portrait. 

The FinePix S8400W has an easy to use mode dial for shooting selection, dual zoom control for speed and precision zooming, and a three-inch, 460K-dot LCD screen. Its electronic viewfinder (EVF) has 201K-dot resolution.

Video capabilities include full HD movie 1080i/60fps in stereo via a dedicated movie button. The high resolution, 1080i movies captured at 60fps in stereo (and slow-motion at 480fps) can be played back on HDTVs. You can even take still photos during video recording. The S8400W also offers a number of in-camera editing features including "movie trimming" and "movie join."

The FinePix S8400W will be available in May 2013 for $350.

XP200 rugged camera 

Fujifilm also announced an addition to its rugged XP Series, the FinePix XP200. The 8.18-ounce compact XP200 features a 16-megapixel CMOS sensor and a reinforced 5x Fujinon lens. It is waterproof to 50 feet, shockproof to 6.6 feet, freezeproof to 14 degrees Fahrenheit  (-10 degrees Celsius), and dustproof. The XP200 also has a redesigned battery door lock with double seals for enhanced protection.

The camera features Shift Image Stabilization for low-light image capture and incorporates an internal 5x optical zoom lens (28-140mm) that allows users to get close to the action, even under water. With digital zoom, the XP200 can double the zoom range to 10x. The maximum aperture is f/3.9 to f/4.9 and the ISO range is 100-6400.

The FinePix XP200 has two high speed shooting modes: 10fps continuous shooting mode at full resolution (maximum 9 frames) and ultra-high speed continuous shooting at up to 60fps (maximum 70 frames in 16:9, S size only). A dedicated burst mode button on the top of the camera is easy to reach. This model offers similar video functionality to the S8400W.

The 4.57 by 2.8 by 1.18-inch XP200 has a three-inch 920K-dot LCD monitor with an anti-reflective coating for bright sunlight viewing. The screen features an automatic brightness adjustment which can be optimized to account for ambient lighting, conserving battery power. The XP200 also features an advanced filter option for photographic special effects.

High speed multi-frame processing records two shots or more at different exposures and then combines them for high dynamic range (HDR) shots. The Motion Panorama 360 feature lets you create a 360-degree panoramic shot by selecting the mode, pressing the shutter button, and spinning around in a circle. Individual Shutter 3D lets you create images with a 3D effect by combining two shots taken from slightly different angles.

The FinePix XP200 will be available in May for $300 in black, yellow, blue, and red.

Wi-Fi transfer

Both cameras feature Fujifilm's wireless functionality that lets you transfer photos and movies from the camera to smartphones, tablets, and computers, and upload images to social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter.

To connect these two new models to a smartphone or tablet, you can download the free Fujifilm Camera Application to an iPhone, iPad, or Android smartphone or tablet to transfer up to 30 pictures at a time. The app also lets you download movies.

With its Wi-Fi capability, the cameras also allow users to back up photos on their PC or Mac. Simply install the free cross-platform Fujifilm PC AutoSave software onto a computer and select the folder where you want your photos backed up. Then link the Wi-Fi router to the camera.

Pictures stored on the camera can also be viewed and selected for download on smartphone or tablet screens. No wireless LAN access point or complicated ID or password is needed, and once pictures have been downloaded to the smartphone, it is easy to upload them to social networking sites.

 


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