We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
78,606 News Articles

Graphics cards for beginners

Everything you need to know before buying

In modern computers the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) is responsible for everything you see on your screen.

Both Windows Vista and 7 can use the GPU to render the desktop, taking advantage of 3D acceleration features to provide smooth window movement, transparency, and other visual effects. Naturally, the 3D graphics in games, educational titles, and such are all rendered by the GPU.

Modern GPUs even have special video processing units that decode, scale, and de-interlace the most popular video formats, improving quality and reducing CPU load and power consumption. GPUs are even starting to be used as highly parallel processors to do certain very math-heavy tasks much faster than the CPU, though this technology is in its infancy.

But beyond that, it gets a little confusing. There are dozens of brand names and model numbers out there, and a whole alphabet soup of buzzwords and acronyms that seem specifically designed to confuse the average customer.

Let's look at some common graphics-related terms and what you should look for when shopping for a graphics card (or choosing which graphics card should be in your next computer or laptop).

nVidia, ATI and Intel

Today, there are three major players in the graphics market. There's nVidia, a company that focuses almost entirely on graphics products. A few years ago the CPU and chipset maker AMD bought Canadian graphics developer and nVidia competitor ATI.

You'll still see the ATI brand quite often; AMD kept it around for their graphics division. Finally there's Intel, which currently only makes integrated graphics products built into the motherboard chipsets for their processors.

Soon, Intel will start shipping processors with graphics integrated right into the CPU. There are other graphics companies out there, but they either focus on devices like mobile phones or have such a tiny piece of the market that they're not worth bringing up.

Which one should you use? This is a point of much contention among graphics fans and gamers. To be honest, nVidia and ATI/AMD both make excellent products and have drivers that are, on the whole and over time, roughly comparable in terms of stability. If you want a discrete graphics card, you should pick whichever one is best at the price you want.

Intel's integrated graphics is what you get when you don't make a choice, basically. Though it has improved greatly over the years, it is still slower than the integrated graphics options from nVidia and ATI, and far slower than discrete graphics solutions.

DirectX

DirectX is an API (Application Programming Interface - a set of conventions and abstractions that let programmers control a piece of hardware like a GPU). DirectX actually contains lots of pieces to deal with things like audio and such, but the part that deals with 3D graphics is called Direct3D.

On Windows, DirectX is by far the most common way that games make use of the GPU, but because it comes from Microsoft and makes use of the Windows driver stack, it's only on Windows.

Windows Vista and 7 support DirectX 10.1 as the latest version, and DirectX 11 is coming to both Windows 7 and Vista very soon. With it comes a few exciting new features. We'll get to that in a minute.

Laptop buying advice

See all laptop reviews

NEXT PAGE: What happens when you're not on Windows

  1. The issues you need to consider when purchasing
  2. What happens when you're not on Windows
  3. CUDA and ATI Stream
  4. SLI and Crossfire


IDG UK Sites

O2 to sell exclusive red HTC One M8

IDG UK Sites

iTunes 12 release date & rumours: When is iTunes 12 coming out?

IDG UK Sites

Welcome to the upgrade cycle - you'll never leave

IDG UK Sites

Why smartphone screens are getting bigger