Teachers are lobbying education secretary Alan Johnson in a bid to instigate a wide-ranging investigation into the potential health risks posed by Wi-Fi networks.

The Professional Association of Teachers has written to Johnson following concerns over the lack of research into the effect of wireless networks in schools, and suggests educational establishments stop installing Wi-Fi equipment until detailed scientific research shows they're safe.

Up to 80 percent of secondary schools and 50 percent of primary schools have Wi-Fi equipment installed, according to The Guardian, although some schools have already scrapped wireless networks in favour of traditional wired alternatives.

Philip Parkin, General Secretary of the Professional Association of Teachers, said: "I have concerns about the health of both pupils and staff.

"I am concerned that so many wireless networks are being installed in schools and colleges without any understanding of the possible long-term consequences. The proliferation of wireless networks could be having serious implications for the health of some staff and pupils without the cause being recognised."

"I am not saying there is a danger, but I have enough concern to ask for it to be investigated."