We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
80,259 News Articles

Schools oppose Wi-Fi over health fears

Teachers and parents lobby against wireless

British parents and teachers are pressuring schools to ban and even dismantle Wi-Fi networks because of health concerns.

The move, reported by The Times, could spark a debate over the evidence or lack of it that electromagnetic emissions, in this case, from 801.11 radios, can be harmful.

Any such debate will send a shock through wireless-LAN vendors, for whom the education market is a critical growth area.

But it's also the latest in what seems to be a rising number of wireless controversies involving school-age and sometimes younger children, covering not only emissions but also privacy, security and safety, and acceptable use of mobile phones, WLANs, and RFID.

Parents convinced the head teacher at one prep school in the UK to dismantle the school's WLAN. "We listened to the parents' views and they were obviously very concerned. We also did a lot of research. The authorities say it's safe, but there have been no long-term studies to prove this," he told The Times.

The story reported on two other schools where health concerns voiced by parents led officials to scrap WLANs in favour of wired networks. A mother of a student at another school likened those concerns to the debate over mobile phone, and mobile phone tower, emissions. The news story quoted her as saying, "Many people campaign against mobile phone masts near schools, but there is a great deal of ignorance about wireless computer networks. Yet they are like having a phone mast in the classroom and the transmitters are placed very close to the children."

One teacher at still another school claims the WLAN made him so ill he was unable to teach. "I felt a steadily widening range of unpleasant effects whenever I was in the classroom," he said. "First came a thick headache, then pains throughout the body, sudden flushes, pressure behind the eyes, sudden skin pains and burning sensations, along with bouts of nausea. Over the weekend, away from the classroom, I felt completely normal."


IDG UK Sites

Best Christmas 2014 UK tech deals, Boxing Day 2014 UK tech deals & January sales 2015 UK tech...

IDG UK Sites

Chromebooks: ready for the prime time (but not for everybody)

IDG UK Sites

Hands-on with Sony's latest smartglasses

IDG UK Sites

Apple TV expert tips: get US Apple TV content, watch Google Play, use multiple Apple IDs and more