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Samsung to use 64-bit processor for Galaxy S5 and new smartphones

Keeping up with the Jones' (aka Apple)

Samsung

Samsung has confirmed its next generation of smartphones, including the Galaxy S5 we assume, will use a 64-bit processor. See our: Samsung Unpacked 5: Galaxy S5 launch live.

Apple's new flagship smartphone, the iPhone 5S, features the A7 64-bit processor with "desktop-class architecture". Not to be outdone, Samsung has already said its upcoming smartphone will also include this technology.  

Shin Jong-kyun, CEO of Samsung Mobile, told The Korea Times: "Samsung understands that Apple intends to boost its mobile business in China, as well as in Japan, meaning that we should try harder in these countries,"

"Not in the shortest time. But yes, our next smartphones will have 64-bit processing functionality," he added.

A 64-bit processor can handle larger amounts of data in a shorter amount of time compared to 32-bit. However, since 64-bit has been limited to desktop computing until now, the benefit is minimal in the short term.

Apple has re-coded iOS 7 for 64-bit though and the iPhone 5S is future proofed in this sense.
With the iPhone 5S being the only 64-bit smartphone, the question is whether developers will opt to write for the better architecture. It will allegedly only take a couple of hours to convert the code for an app to 64-bit.

An app written for 64-bit won't work on a 32-bit chip but a 64-bit still supports 32-bit coding. So it remains to be seen whether we'll see both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of apps appear in the App Store.

"Yes, a 64bit architecture on the iPhone 5S is technically compelling, and will establish Apple as a solid gaming platform (and what does 64bit do for battery life, and don’t you want to play on larger screens?, ask Samsung), and the new dedicated chip to handle motion sensors is interesting and sensible, but I’d argue that the option of having colours is more compelling for many more mainstream consumers." said Matthew Knight, head of innovation at global media agency Carat.

Follow Chris Martin and @PCAdvisor on Twitter.


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