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Apple fails to make iPhone jailbreaking a crime

Jailbreaking 'innocuous at worst, beneficial at best'

The US Copyright Office and the Library of Congress yesterday ruled that the practice of hacking an Apple iPhone to install unauthorised apps is not a crime in the US. The decision will disappoint Apple, which was hoping to criminalise so-called 'jailbreaking'.

The UK remains unaffected by the US ruling: jailbreaking is frowned upon by Apple, but is not illegal.

The US decision, which was announced Monday by Librarian of Congress James Billington, adds jailbreaking to the list of practices that do not violate the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

"When one jailbreaks a smartphone in order to make the operating system on that phone interoperable with an independently created application that has not been approved by the maker of the smartphone or the maker of its operating system, the modifications that are made purely for the purpose of such interoperability are fair uses," Marybeth Peters, Register of Copyrights, wrote in the ruling approved by Billington ( download PDF ).

Peters also blasted Apple's 2009 contention that hacking the iPhone was a violation of US copyright law because the practice relied on pirated copies of the smartphone's bootloader and operating system.

"Apple's objections to the installation and use of unapproved applications appears to have nothing to do with its interests as the owner of copyrights in the computer programs embodied in the iPhone, and running the unapproved applications has no adverse effect on those interests," she wrote in her ruling. "Rather, Apple's objections relate to its interests as a manufacturer and distributor of a device, the iPhone."

Apple submitted comments to the Copyright Office in February 2009 after the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) asked for a DCMA exemption in 2008 for mobile phone jailbreaking. The EFF, and technology companies that supported it, including Firefox maker Mozilla, wanted the Copyright Office to allow users to install applications not available through Apple's App Store without fear of copyright infringement penalties.

The DCMA and Apple's argument were among the reasons why Mozilla and Norway-based Opera Software declined to create iPhone versions of their Firefox and Opera browsers.

Opera later released Opera Mini, a proxy-based program, for the iPhone. Although Mozilla is actively working on mobile editions of Firefox, it said it would not develop a version for the iPhone. Instead, it recently shipped Firefox Home, a spin-off of the bookmark and tab synchronization technology it currently offers as an add-on to the desktop browser.

The EFF applauded the decision to de-criminalize iPhone jailbreaking.

"Copyright law has long held that making programs interoperable is fair use," said Corynne McSherry, EFF's senior staff attorney, in a statement Monday . "It's gratifying that the Copyright Office acknowledges this right and agrees that the anticircumvention laws should not interfere with interoperability."

Today's ruling also gave a limited green light to security researchers investigating vulnerabilities in computer and videogame console software that are defended by technology copy-protection schemes.

"The socially productive purpose of investigating computer security and informing the public do not involve use of the creative aspects of the work and are unlikely to have an adverse effect on the market for or value of the copyrighted work itself," Peters ruled.

Peters asked for and received confirmation from Billington that a special class be protected against DCMA prosecution. "The Register recommends that the Librarian designate a class of video games protected by access controls, when circumvention is done for the purpose of good faith testing for, investigating, or correcting security flaws or vulnerabilities," Peters said.

See also: Analysis: Why iPhone users jailbreak their phones

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