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10 'offensive' iPhone apps Apple blocked

The tools that didn't make it into the App Store

Apple has insisted on full control over its iTunes App Store, which offers downloadable software for the iPhone and the iPod Touch. This has irked more than a few app developers, especially when their creations have been rejected for inclusion in the store, for on occasions, silly reasons.

The company won't reveal much about its mysterious and often seemingly-arbitrary process (representatives didn't respond to multiple requests to comment on this story), but we had no problem tracking down developers whose apps had been snubbed. So here are our favourite 10 iPhone apps that Apple saw fit to ban.

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Apple iTunes App store review

1. Obama Trampoline

Swamiware's Obama Trampoline game, rejected by Apple last month , lets you place one of 18 politicians onto a giant trampoline, then use his or her body to pop balloons floating across the screen. Barack Obama, John McCain, and other politicians from both parties were among the character choices.

"It's cartoony," says Swamiware President and CEO Patrick Alphonso, hoping to deflate any implications of disrespect. "It's a game."

Apple, of course, didn't see the fun, and the game didn't get in. Swamiware is now working on retooling Trampoline for another try, but the guesswork is leaving its team less than elated.

"We spent a lot of time and money on this product," Alphonso says. "It sucks to develop an app and get it rejected for reasons that you weren't aware of."

2. MyShoe

The journalist who chucked his shoe at President George W Bush missed his mark, and so too did an iPhone game based on the now-infamous incident. MyShoe, conceived by a Pakistan-based programmer, turned the iPhone's accelerometer into an apparatus for imaginary footwear-flinging.

The developer has been quoted as saying the game also let you take aim at Bin Laden and other public figures. Even so, it appears that Apple wanted to dodge the controversy, with its reviewers citing the App Store's rule against "ridiculing public figures" and flinging this idea right into the trash.

3. I Am Poor

You probably remember the ill-fated (and, most would say, ill-inspired) I Am Rich application. The $1,000 (£700) function-free program - all it did was place a silly, shiny icon on your screen - got snubbed out just days after its debut. Grabbing less attention, though, was the far more affordable alternative, I Am Poor.

"It was the poor man's I Am Rich," explains developer Hardy Macia of Catamount Software, perhaps better known for its Prohibition 2: The Dope Wars, also rejected by the App Store.

Priced at $0.99 (70p), I Am Poor placed images of pot noodles, tuna and macaroni-and-cheese onto your humble home screen. Apple, however, didn't find the idea appetising and slapped a 'no user functionality' stamp on it.

"Their policies and approval are shrouded in mystery," Macia says. "Whenever an app is submitted, it seems like playing Russian roulette."

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NEXT PAGE: The South Park app and other rejected by Apple

  1. The apps that didn't get shelf space in the app store
  2. The South Park app and other rejected by Apple
  3. iBoobs, Slasher and Muderdrome
  4. Podcaster and Freedom Time



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