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Mozilla mobile browser available for Nokia N810

Fennec alpha works on Nokia internet tablets


Mozilla has released an alpha version of its mobile browser for Nokia's N810 and N800 internet tablets.

It's the first public release of the browser, code-named Fennec. Despite being made by Nokia, the Linux-based N800 devices aren't quite mobile phones. They are larger than a phone but smaller than a laptop and can connect to the internet via Wi-Fi. They don't include cellular capabilities, although users can connect a phone to the device to reach the mobile internet. The devices are popular with developers because they use open-source software, but Nokia has not revealed sales figures to indicate how many are in the market.

In addition to the alpha release for the internet tablets, Mozilla is offering a PC emulator that developers can download to their desktops to see some of the features included in the browser and to get a feel for the user interface, said Jay Sullivan, vice president of mobile for Mozilla.

"This is really for our community to be able to test and localise and build add-ons," he said, referring to both the emulator and the internet tablet release.

Mozilla hopes that this release will result in some good user feedback, Sullivan said. "The next step in the roadmap is to start optimising for performance," he said.

His group has simultaneously been developing a version of Fennec for Windows Mobile phones. While Sullivan said they've been working hard on it, he wouldn't reveal a release time frame for that browser. His group has also been looking at developing the browser for LiMo phones that are based on the mobile Linux operating system and for Symbian phones, he said.

One unique feature to the browser is that it displays control buttons, such as back and forward, off screen. Users flick the screen to the left or right to display and click the buttons. "One of our big goals is to take advantage of the whole screen, because they are pretty small," Sullivan said. The design lets a webpage fill the whole screen.

He also thinks that Fennec will be unique because Firefox developers will be able to build add-ons for it. "We don't claim to have all the answers. We want to build a great product but make it extensible so anyone can hack on it," he said.

Mobile browsing has historically been a painful experience and countless handset and software makers have created mobile browsers hoping to make them easier to use. While mobile browser development from the likes of Apple, Google and Microsoft is unlikely to cease because of Fennec, other mobile browser efforts may, Sullivan said. "When our browser is ready, a lot of folks will stop building custom browsers," he said. "Carriers and OEMs are telling me they'd rather ship Firefox rather than hack together their own browser."

NEXT PAGE: Mozilla's previous attempts to build a mobile browser


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