We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
80,258 News Articles

Verizon, AT&T, Google among top 10 lobbyers

Google, AT&T and Verizon Communications were among the top corporate lobbyers of the U.S. government in the fourth quarter of 2012, according to data released recently by the House of Representatives.

In the fourth quarter, Verizon spent $3.48 million, AT&T spent $3.4 million and Google spent $3.35 million, putting them among the top 10 spenders for the period. For its part, Microsoft spent $2.43 million in the same time frame.

Google's lobbying tab for the year was up 70% from 2011, and Facebook's spending in the fourth quarter was up 318% from a year earlier, according to Consumer Watchdog.

The nonprofit consumer advocacy group finds cause for concern in the upward trend. "[Google and Facebook] are following the corrupt tradition in Washington: Buying what you want," said John Simpson, director of Consumer Watchdog's Privacy Project.

Google didn't immediately respond to requests for comment on its lobbying efforts. Verizon and Microsoft refused to comment.

A Facebook spokesperson said the social network's lobbying efforts reflect, among other things, its commitment to "explaining... the actions we take to protect the billion-plus people who use our service."

This version of this story was originally published in Computerworld's print edition. It was adapted from an article that appeared earlier on Computerworld.com.

Read more about government/industries in Computerworld's Government/Industries Topic Center.


IDG UK Sites

Best Christmas 2014 UK tech deals, Boxing Day 2014 UK tech deals & January sales 2015 UK tech...

IDG UK Sites

LED vs Halogen: Why now could be the right time to invest in LED bulbs

IDG UK Sites

Christmas' best ads: See great festive spots studios have created to promote themselves and clients

IDG UK Sites

Why Apple shouldn't be blamed for exploitation in China and Indonesia