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Facebook boosts revenue by 32 percent in first public financial report

The company also reported a net loss, attributable to IPO-related costs

Facebook boosted revenue by 32 percent in its first earnings report as a public company, bringing in US$1.18 billion and topping analysts' expectations slightly.

The company blamed its net loss of $157 million for the quarter that ended June 30 on the fact that after its IPO, it recognized $1.3 billion of share-based compensation and related payroll tax expenses. Facebook had a $240 million profit in the same quarter of last year.

Analysts polled by Thomson/First Call expected $1.15 billion in revenue. Adjusted for one-time expenses, earnings per share were in line with analysts' expectations at US$0.12. Those earnings are based on an adjusted net income figure of $295 million, slightly increased from adjusted net income of $285 million in the same quarter of 2011.

As expected, mobile users were the growth highlight for the company, increasing 67 percent year-over-year to 543 million as of June 30. Monthly active users were up 29 percent to 955 million, while daily active users were up 32 percent to 552 million on average.

Advertising revenue accounted for 84 percent of the total take at $992 million, up 28 percent year over year. Payments and other fees revenue were $192 million in the quarter.

Cameron Scott covers search, web services and privacy for The IDG News Service. Follow Cameron on Twitter at CScott_IDG.


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