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Talent pool not big enough to meet skyrocketing cloud computing job demand

VMware, Microsoft, Amazon are top hiring cloud companies

The number of job postings in the cloud computing industry is growing so rapidly that there aren't enough qualified workers available to fill the positions, according to an analysis of hiring trends by Wanted Analytics.

There were 5,000 jobs posted online related to cloud technology, a 92% increase from the same month last year and a more than four times increase compared to 2010.

"With the demand for cloud skills growing so quickly, the gap between hiring demand and talent supply across the United States is getting larger and causing more difficulties in sourcing candidates," the report said.

The number of job postings in the cloud computing industry is growing so rapidly that there aren't enough qualified workers available to fill the positions, according to an analysis of hiring trends by Wanted Analytics.

There were 5,000 jobs posted online related to cloud technology, a 92% increase from the same month last year and a more than four times increase compared to 2010.

"With the demand for cloud skills growing so quickly, the gap between hiring demand and talent supply across the United States is getting larger and causing more difficulties in sourcing candidates," the report said.

READ: What the cloud really means for your IT job

Most of the cloud jobs are from service providers, with VMware posting the most cloud jobs last month with 360, according to Wanted Analytics. Microsoft had the second most with 230, while Amazon.com, URS Corp. and Google rounded out the top five.

Cloud computing jobs in the highest demand are technical skills, such as software engineers, systems engineers and network administrators.

About a quarter of the job postings sought candidates with cloud knowledge, but it's not just technology jobs that employers are looking to fill. The leading non-technical jobs where cloud skills were desired included marketing managers, sales managers, management analytics and financial analysts. Those are for jobs in marketing cloud services, or marketing a cloud-based offering, says Carolyn Menz of Wanted Analytics.

San Jose is the top metropolitan market for cloud jobs, with more than 900 cloud postings last month, up 144% compared to the same month last year. Seattle, Washington D.C., San Francisco and New York City are other hotbeds for cloud jobs.

San Francisco is the toughest place for cloud-seeking employers to hire, Wanted Analytics found. It took businesses in that market eight weeks to fill a position, which the firm said suggests there are not enough talented workers to meet the job demand. In middle-market regions, such as Tuscon, Ariz., Madison, Wis., and Charlottsville, Va., it took only 5.5 weeks to fill a cloud-related job, which is faster than the national average, Wanted Analytics found.

Cloud is one of the hottest industries Wanted Analytics tracks. The firm uses job postings from online job search engines, corporate pages and other means to analyze job posting trends.

Demand for video game developers rose 40% compared to last year during the two months ending in March. Demand for privacy officers increased 56% in the first quarter of 2012 compared to the year before and robotics job postings were up 44% year-over-year in January.

This article originally appeared at NetworkWorld.com. Network World staff writer Brandon Butler covers cloud computing and social media. He can be reached at BButler@nww.com and found on Twitter at @BButlerNWW.

Read more about cloud computing in Network World's Cloud Computing section.


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