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Ofcom unveils first interactive broadband speeds map

UK is broken down into colour-coded areas

Ofcom has unveiled it's first interactive map that depicts fixed broadband speeds across the UK.

The UK is broken down into 200 administrative authroities on the map, which have been colour coded based upon the availability of superfast broadband in the area (24Mbps or above) as well as average broadband take-up, average actual speeds for both ADSL and the percentage of homes in the area not currently receiving 2mbps services. The areas in green have the highest scores across these requirements, followed by blue, orange and purple, while the areas depicted in red score the lowest.

Ofcom revealed 68 percent of the UK has fixed broadband connection and the maximum average speed is 7.5Mbps, although this excludes superfast connections.

Furthermore, Brighton & Hove has the highest take-up of fixed broadband services with 80 percent and Edinburgh has the fastest average maximum speeds at 10.1Mbps.

Fermanagh, a rural area of Ireland, has the slowest average broadband speed at 4.3Mbps and Kingston-upon-Hull has the lowest take-up at 50 percent. Ofcom also said 14 percent of Brits who have fixed broadband connections (excluding superfast broadband services) are currently receiving speeds of less than 2Mbps.

Ofcom Chief Executive, Ed Richards, said: "We are now developing a clear picture of the UK's fixed broadband infrastructure and how it delivers for consumers. We hope that this information will stimulate further rollout of broadband infrastructure and better performance for households and businesses."

According to Michael Phillips, product director at comparison site Broadbandchoices.co.uk the interactive broadband map is a very useful tool to generate broader awareness of how services vary by location but it does not give service information by provider or by specific address.

"There is no real substitute to doing a postcode check on an Ofcom accredited comparison site to check exactly what is available in your local area.

Phillips said the real question is whether by submitting this kind of information, politicians will really be encouraged to act to improve broadband services as there are clearly many areas that continue to get a raw deal.

"Ofcom's map demonstrates that huge swathes of the country are receiving a below par broadband connection which is extremely disappointing given that the UK is supposed to be a leading light in business and technology services and the clock is ticking on the government's commitment to digital Britain..."

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