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15 technology tricks that are naughty but nice

They're fun but you shouldn't do them, right?

Rules were made to be broken, right? And technology is no exception. We've rounded up 15 awesome things relating to technology that you really shouldn't do. Break these rules at your own peril.

EDITOR'S NOTE: PC Advisor neither recommends nor condones the social media tricks below. Using either trick is a bad idea and, in the case of hijacking someone's account, a criminal offence.

6. Hijack someone else's Facebook or Twitter account

Find yourself loitering in internet cafés or airport lounges with time to kill? Why not hack into your neighbour's Facebook or Twitter account? Just install Firesheep and log on to a public Wi-Fi network; Firesheep alerts you when someone is attempting to log on via an unencrypted connection and snatches their browser cookie out of thin air. Double-click the cookie inside Firesheep, and you're in. What you do from there is up to you and your conscience.
(To avoid suffering the same fate, you can install the Force TLS plug in to encrypt communications over public Wi-Fi.)

Why this is awesome: Everyone has a little voyeur inside them - but really the only reason we included this item was so we could tell you about Force TLS.

Why you shouldn't do it: You're almost certainly violating the terms of service for any account you hack, and you're definitely violating someone's privacy, which is unethical. Depending on what you do with the accounts, you could also be guilty of violating laws regarding computer fraud or be liable to civil suits for defamation, says Jonathan Ezor, director of the Touro Law Center Institute for Business, Law and Technology. Also: Most people's accounts are boring.

7. Hack your Wii

Those Nintendo dudes are pretty clever, but despite the fact the Wii comes with a DVD drive, it won't play DVD movies. That's why it's incumbent upon you to correct the injustice by hacking your Wii.

The helpful deviants over at How-To Geek have the buzz on how to pull this off. You'll need a Windows PC with an SD memory card reader, a FAT-16-formatted SD card, the Wii Brew SD Installer, and a copy of The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess. No, seriously. (If you don't own a Windows PC - in which case, are you sure you're on the right web site? - you can perform the hack manually by following instructions provided by WikiBrew.org.)

Why this is awesome: Aside from watching Marmaduke on your Wii, you can run Homebrew apps like ComixChannel and WiiRadio. You'll also be able to back up your Wii games and store them on an external drive.

Why you shouldn't do it: If ever your Wii needs repairing...well we hope you're handy with a screwdriver. We wouldn't count on the warranty holding up.

8. Impersonate someone famous on Twitter

We know that @aplusk belongs to Demi's boy toy, Ashton Kutcher and @KylieMinogue is the Australian Pop Princess herself . But what about @chucknorris and @Nick_Nolte?
Nope. They're just fakes - Twitter accounts designed to fool the masses into imagining that they've stumbled upon the ruminations of the celeb in question. Some are obvious parodies; others are just clever (or evil) imitations. Because if you're going to waste time on Twitter, you might as well mess with people's minds while you're there.

Why this is awesome: Like @BPGlobalPR, you could achieve 15 minutes of internet fame by skewering an evil multinational corporation while delighting thousands.

Why you shouldn't do it: If Twitter finds out that the account is bogus - and is clearly not a parody - it will suspend the account. And as with hacked Facebook accounts, you could be held liable for defamation or trademark violations, depending on what you do. So phweet with care.

NEXT PAGE: Make email Vanish

  1. Naughty tech tricks
  2. Maintain multiple Facebook identities
  3. Hijack someone else's Facebook or Twitter account
  4. Make email Vanish
  5. Ditch that DRM
  6. Maintain multiple Facebook identities


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