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15 technology tricks that are naughty but nice

They're fun but you shouldn't do them, right?

Rules were made to be broken, right? And technology is no exception. We've rounded up 15 awesome things relating to technology that you really shouldn't do. Break these rules at your own peril.

3. Maintain multiple Facebook identities

A fake Facebook persona is good for more than just stalking your ex or posting nasty things about your boss; you can use it to say or 'like' things without repercussions, or play FarmVille and other obnoxious Facebook apps without risking your personal information and annoying your real friends. All you really need is an email address, a pretty picture, and some bogus details - and you're off to the races.

Another benefit: You can do what my son did and create a second Facebook account to deceive your parents and other adult relatives while saving the real one for your peeps. (Kids, if you do try this at home, remember: Don't log into the real account from dad's computer and then forget to log out. That will not go so well for you.)

Why this is awesome: No privacy risk and very little chance that your employer or loved ones will know it's you (unless, of course, you log in and forget to log out).

Why you shouldn't do it: It violates Facebook's terms of service, which means real you and fake you could both get the boot. Of course, Facebook often fails to follow its own rules, so why should you treat them as sacrosanct?

4. Get creative With Wikipedia

Did you know that that Lady Gaga is really a man in drag? Neither does anyone else - until you add it to Wikipedia. Few things are more satisfying than adding spurious 'fact'" to the people's encyclopedia just to see if anyone notices. Hours, days, or weeks later, some self-important Wikipedian will red pencil it, probably leaving a snotty comment in the page's history. That's where the real fun begins.

Why this is awesome: You can practically hear that Wikepedian's sphincter tighten as you engage in an edit war over Lady Gaga's man parts.

Why you shouldn't do it: You could be banned from editing any more entries.

5. Tear down a paywall

You want how much for that subscription to StuffICanReadElsewhereForFree.com? Uh, no thanks. I'll just use someone else's log-in and password. And what better way to do it than with BugMeNot? That's where you'll find user names and passwords for both pay and free sites like NYTimes.com, WashingtonPost.com, IMDB, and YouTube. Even if the site is free, BugMeNot will allow you to leave devastating ripostes in an article's comments section without having to surrender your real name or email address.

Why this is awesome: Aside from avoiding subscription fees (you skinflint), you won't get spammed with advertising offers that 'may interest you' or banned by sanctimonious comments czars (you know who you are).

Why you shouldn't do it: You'll be hammering another nail into the coffin of real journalism. And you'll feel bad. Trust us.

NEXT PAGE: Hijack someone else's Facebook or Twitter account

  1. Naughty tech tricks
  2. Maintain multiple Facebook identities
  3. Hijack someone else's Facebook or Twitter account
  4. Make email Vanish
  5. Ditch that DRM
  6. Maintain multiple Facebook identities


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