We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
80,259 News Articles

The 5 best free online storage services

Store, sync and share your files for no charge

We put five free online storage services, which let you upload your files to a 'virtual hard drive' and access them from your other devices, to the test to find out just which is the best one for you.

Dropbox

Launched in early 2008, Dropbox has garnered a large following - the San Francisco-based company announced it had four million users as of January 2010.

 

How it works
The Dropbox software installs itself in the form of a desktop folder. To sync files, you drag and drop files into the Dropbox folder or into one of its subfolders, and the files will immediately be uploaded to Dropbox's servers.

The Dropbox folder can be treated like any other folder on your local drive. For example, if you create or save a document directly to the Dropbox folder, the document file is automatically uploaded to your account on the Dropbox servers. This file will then be instantly downloaded to any of your other computers on which the Dropbox client program is installed.

To share your subfolders with others, you right-click on one of your Dropbox subfolders and select 'Share This Folder'. This brings up a web form in your browser where you enter the email addresses of the people you want to share the folder with. They are sent a link that will allow them to access your shared folder through the Dropbox site. (Non-users of Dropbox will be required to register for a free account.)

If the people you've selected have the Dropbox software installed on their computers or mobile devices, then your shared subfolder will appear under their Dropbox folder and its contents will be downloaded to their local hard drives.

What's good
File syncing was fast and instantaneous, and it happened as soon as I logged my remote notebook into a Wi-Fi service.

Dropbox provides client programs for a variety of operating systems, making it an attractive choice if you own a number of devices that run on different platforms.

What needs to be fixed
The client software has a bare-bones set of features. You have to log into your account through the Dropbox website for extras, such as the ability to read a log that lists the files that have been updated, uploaded or deleted from your Dropbox folders.

Bottom line
Despite its minimalist desktop software, Dropbox is a very direct and easy-to-use service, abiding by the 'it just works' mantra. It's obvious to see why it has become the most popular choice among cloud-based, store-and-sync services.

Product Specs

OS: Windows XP/Vista/7, OS X 10.4 or later, Ubuntu Linux 7.10+ and Fedora Core Linux 9+

Mobile apps: Android, iPad, iPhone

Storage size: 2GB

Maximum file size: Unlimited using client software; under 300MB when using Web site

Daily data-transfer limit: None

Paid plans: $9.99(£6.38) per month or $99 (£63.80) per year for 50GB; $19.99 (£12.78) per month or $199 (£127.80) per year for 100GB

NEXT PAGE: OpenDrive

  1. Store, sync and share your files for no charge
  2. DriveHQ FileManager
  3. Dropbox
  4. OpenDrive
  5. SpideOak
  6. ZumoDrive
  7. Conclusions


IDG UK Sites

iPad mini 3 vs iPad mini 2 comparison: New iPad mini 3 isn't worth £80 more

IDG UK Sites

Why you shouldn't buy the iPad mini 3: No wonder Apple gave it 10 seconds of stage time

IDG UK Sites

Halloween Photoshop tutorials: 13 masterclasses for horrifying art, designs and type

IDG UK Sites

Should I upgrade from Mavericks to OS X 10.10 Yosemite? What you need to know before updating to...