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YouTube pays UK contributors

Earn money by posting videos to YouTube

The YouTube Partner Programme is being launched in the UK. The YouTube Partner Programme offers users the chance to make money from videos they post on the Google-owned video-sharing site.

The programme gives users a share of the revenue generated from advertisements that run next to their video. The more videos you post and the more popular they are, the more money you make. Already in action in the US, the YouTube Partner Programme has seen some contributors make thousands of dollars.

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Although YouTube won’t disclose the exact percentages paid, it does say that those making "several thousand dollars a month" are regularly producing videos that gain more than one million views. According to the site, US 'Partners' including comedians ApauledTV and singer/songwriter Tay Zonday have already become responsible for a significant percentage of YouTube's total traffic.

Chocolate Rain, a song by Tay Zonday has enjoyed 14m clicks to date, spawned over 1,000 response videos, and has seen drinks brand Dr Pepper create a product around it and make Zonday the star of a glossy ad to promote it. Visit Broadband Advisor to find out what's hot on the internet.

Following its launch in the UK, YouTube hopes to expand the Partner Programme to the rest of Europe soon.

RELATED ARTICLE: Google starts paying YouTube contributors


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